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European Central Asia

Resources

Latest resources from across the Federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

Youth Voices, Youth Choices research report front cover

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, North Macedonia, Kosovo

Resource

Young people’s access to SRH information, education and care in the Western Balkans in Covid times

These reports present the findings of a study on young people's SRHR, focusing on the impacts of COVID-19.

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State of African Women Report
Resource

| 29 November 2019

Sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU-Africa partnership

The Cotonou Partnership Agreement (CPA) between the European Union (EU) and the group of 79 African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries will expire in February 2020. Currently, a new agreement is being negotiated. As negotiations advance, some points of diversion between both parties progressively emerge such as the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights4 (SRHR) agenda. The EU negotiation directives for a post-Cotonou agreement provides strong commitments towards SRHR, whereas the ACP negotiating mandate discards the rights component which notably implies the risk of strictly putting the focus on “service delivery” (access to quality Sexual and Reproductive Health services for all) rather than on a holistic approach (SRHR). Attaining and maintaining reproductive and sexual health implies respecting and promoting fundamental human rights, such as the right to decide the number and spacing of one’s children, the right to consensual marriage and sexual relations, the right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on matters related to one’s sexuality, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. SRHR, in its comprehensive and holistic sense, is central and fundamental to people’s health and well-being. The comprehensive nature of the SRHR agenda must be duly reflected in the future EU-Africa pillar of the EU-ACP post-2020 agreement. This factsheet includes recommendations on how the EU-Africa partnership could integrate and recognise a fully SRHR perspective. For a full overview over the current status of implementation of continental commitments on women’s and girls’ rights in Africa read this report.

State of African Women Report
Resource

| 29 November 2019

Sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU-Africa partnership

The Cotonou Partnership Agreement (CPA) between the European Union (EU) and the group of 79 African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries will expire in February 2020. Currently, a new agreement is being negotiated. As negotiations advance, some points of diversion between both parties progressively emerge such as the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights4 (SRHR) agenda. The EU negotiation directives for a post-Cotonou agreement provides strong commitments towards SRHR, whereas the ACP negotiating mandate discards the rights component which notably implies the risk of strictly putting the focus on “service delivery” (access to quality Sexual and Reproductive Health services for all) rather than on a holistic approach (SRHR). Attaining and maintaining reproductive and sexual health implies respecting and promoting fundamental human rights, such as the right to decide the number and spacing of one’s children, the right to consensual marriage and sexual relations, the right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on matters related to one’s sexuality, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. SRHR, in its comprehensive and holistic sense, is central and fundamental to people’s health and well-being. The comprehensive nature of the SRHR agenda must be duly reflected in the future EU-Africa pillar of the EU-ACP post-2020 agreement. This factsheet includes recommendations on how the EU-Africa partnership could integrate and recognise a fully SRHR perspective. For a full overview over the current status of implementation of continental commitments on women’s and girls’ rights in Africa read this report.

Georgia youth
Resource

| 30 September 2019

Decision-makers owe young people relationship and sexuality education

IPPF EN is fighting with and for young people so that they have the chance to develop the life skills needed to foster healthier and safer relationships, based on equality and respect. Over the past few decades we have seen increased support for relationship and sexuality education with several countries in Europe and Central Asia setting an ambitious tone. Nonetheless, access to relationship and sexuality education varies widely across countries, as many governments continue to deprive young people of crucial life skills that would enable them to have happy and healthy relationships and lives. At IPPF EN, we believe that the quality of someone’s sexuality education should not be reduced to a geographical lottery. Sexist and coercive movements are spreading misinformation about relationship and sexuality education. These movements oppose efforts to break down harmful and rigid gender norms around masculinity and femininity. They attack education that promotes awareness and respect for gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual pleasure and sexual rights. In this context, IPPF Member Associations are working tirelessly to enable young people to develop knowledge and life skills that support their health and well-being - through trainings for educators, the implementation of innovative programmes outside school settings, and advocacy for mandatory relationship and sexuality education. To learn more about the work done in different countries on ensuring young people access relationship and sexuality education, read our three blog series.

Georgia youth
Resource

| 30 September 2019

Decision-makers owe young people relationship and sexuality education

IPPF EN is fighting with and for young people so that they have the chance to develop the life skills needed to foster healthier and safer relationships, based on equality and respect. Over the past few decades we have seen increased support for relationship and sexuality education with several countries in Europe and Central Asia setting an ambitious tone. Nonetheless, access to relationship and sexuality education varies widely across countries, as many governments continue to deprive young people of crucial life skills that would enable them to have happy and healthy relationships and lives. At IPPF EN, we believe that the quality of someone’s sexuality education should not be reduced to a geographical lottery. Sexist and coercive movements are spreading misinformation about relationship and sexuality education. These movements oppose efforts to break down harmful and rigid gender norms around masculinity and femininity. They attack education that promotes awareness and respect for gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual pleasure and sexual rights. In this context, IPPF Member Associations are working tirelessly to enable young people to develop knowledge and life skills that support their health and well-being - through trainings for educators, the implementation of innovative programmes outside school settings, and advocacy for mandatory relationship and sexuality education. To learn more about the work done in different countries on ensuring young people access relationship and sexuality education, read our three blog series.

gender equality and SRHR in the EU
Resource

| 19 July 2019

How can you, as a MEP, promote gender equality and sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU?

In 2019-2024, we call on Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) to ensure that all Europeans can lead free and safe private and family lives, in a society free from sexism and discrimination. This paper lays down the areas where the EU has internal competences and where MEPs have the power to act.   Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) have a critical role in promoting SRHR in EU external action and upholding the right of young women and men around the world to lead safe and dignified lives, free from coercion and harm. These are just some of the steps MEPs can take to champion SRHR.

gender equality and SRHR in the EU
Resource

| 19 July 2019

How can you, as a MEP, promote gender equality and sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU?

In 2019-2024, we call on Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) to ensure that all Europeans can lead free and safe private and family lives, in a society free from sexism and discrimination. This paper lays down the areas where the EU has internal competences and where MEPs have the power to act.   Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) have a critical role in promoting SRHR in EU external action and upholding the right of young women and men around the world to lead safe and dignified lives, free from coercion and harm. These are just some of the steps MEPs can take to champion SRHR.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 09 July 2019

Financial Statements 2018

Income for the year for the group increased by US$9.5 million (9%)to US$111.9 million due to a large increase in restricted income from US$30.3 million to US$54.1 million netted off against a decrease in unrestricted income of US$14.3 million.  Total group expenditure increased by US$21.6 million to US$114.6 million which led to a group net operating deficit (combined for unrestricted and restricted funds) for the year of US$2.6 million. Total unrestricted expenditure of US$74.8 million includes grants to member associations and partners (US$42.0 million), group secretariat expenditure (US$28.9 million), and fundraising costs(US$3.3 million). The net operating unrestricted deficit for the year was US$17.0 million (2017 surplus: US$8.8 million). Total restricted expenditure of US$39.8 million includes grants to member associations and partners (US$25.2 million), group secretariat expenditure (US$14.0 million), and fundraising costs (US$0.5 million). There was a restricted surplus of US$14.4 million.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 09 July 2019

Financial Statements 2018

Income for the year for the group increased by US$9.5 million (9%)to US$111.9 million due to a large increase in restricted income from US$30.3 million to US$54.1 million netted off against a decrease in unrestricted income of US$14.3 million.  Total group expenditure increased by US$21.6 million to US$114.6 million which led to a group net operating deficit (combined for unrestricted and restricted funds) for the year of US$2.6 million. Total unrestricted expenditure of US$74.8 million includes grants to member associations and partners (US$42.0 million), group secretariat expenditure (US$28.9 million), and fundraising costs(US$3.3 million). The net operating unrestricted deficit for the year was US$17.0 million (2017 surplus: US$8.8 million). Total restricted expenditure of US$39.8 million includes grants to member associations and partners (US$25.2 million), group secretariat expenditure (US$14.0 million), and fundraising costs (US$0.5 million). There was a restricted surplus of US$14.4 million.

See The Cost
Resource

| 24 June 2019

Make gender equality a reality: Sexual and reproductive rights are key aspects of health and well-being for all people

We can't achieve gender equality without having access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).  SRHR underpin the health and well-being of all Europeans, from access to contraceptives and abortion care, sexual health services, relationships and sexuality education, to being protected from violence and coercion, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. However, access to SRHR varies greatly within and between EU Member States, which is particularly harmful to those in the most vulnerable situations. Furthermore, recent years have seen a rise of coercive movements both within and outside of the EU, with gender equality, women’s rights and reproductive freedom increasingly under attack. This paper lays down the steps to be taken to counter future such attempts that seek to restrict reproductive freedom and gender equality.

See The Cost
Resource

| 24 June 2019

Make gender equality a reality: Sexual and reproductive rights are key aspects of health and well-being for all people

We can't achieve gender equality without having access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).  SRHR underpin the health and well-being of all Europeans, from access to contraceptives and abortion care, sexual health services, relationships and sexuality education, to being protected from violence and coercion, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. However, access to SRHR varies greatly within and between EU Member States, which is particularly harmful to those in the most vulnerable situations. Furthermore, recent years have seen a rise of coercive movements both within and outside of the EU, with gender equality, women’s rights and reproductive freedom increasingly under attack. This paper lays down the steps to be taken to counter future such attempts that seek to restrict reproductive freedom and gender equality.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 28 May 2019

All people deserve to lead free and safe sexual and reproductive lives

Sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) underpin the health and well-being of all Europeans, from access to contraceptive and abortion care, sexual health services, and comprehensive sexuality education, to being protected from violence and coercion, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. When people are denied universal access to SRHR, achieving gender equality is impossible. Unfortunately, in 2019, access to these rights varies greatly within and between EU Member States (MS), which is particularly harmful to those in the most vulnerable situations. SRHR are increasingly under threat, with the rise of illiberal coercive movements against gender equality, women’s and LGBTI rights, and a shrinking civil society space within the EU. This paper lays down what MEPs can do to champion sexual and reproductive health and rights. It is available in English, Spanish, French, Dutch, Romanian and Greek.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 28 May 2019

All people deserve to lead free and safe sexual and reproductive lives

Sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) underpin the health and well-being of all Europeans, from access to contraceptive and abortion care, sexual health services, and comprehensive sexuality education, to being protected from violence and coercion, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. When people are denied universal access to SRHR, achieving gender equality is impossible. Unfortunately, in 2019, access to these rights varies greatly within and between EU Member States (MS), which is particularly harmful to those in the most vulnerable situations. SRHR are increasingly under threat, with the rise of illiberal coercive movements against gender equality, women’s and LGBTI rights, and a shrinking civil society space within the EU. This paper lays down what MEPs can do to champion sexual and reproductive health and rights. It is available in English, Spanish, French, Dutch, Romanian and Greek.

State of African Women Report
Resource

| 29 November 2019

Sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU-Africa partnership

The Cotonou Partnership Agreement (CPA) between the European Union (EU) and the group of 79 African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries will expire in February 2020. Currently, a new agreement is being negotiated. As negotiations advance, some points of diversion between both parties progressively emerge such as the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights4 (SRHR) agenda. The EU negotiation directives for a post-Cotonou agreement provides strong commitments towards SRHR, whereas the ACP negotiating mandate discards the rights component which notably implies the risk of strictly putting the focus on “service delivery” (access to quality Sexual and Reproductive Health services for all) rather than on a holistic approach (SRHR). Attaining and maintaining reproductive and sexual health implies respecting and promoting fundamental human rights, such as the right to decide the number and spacing of one’s children, the right to consensual marriage and sexual relations, the right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on matters related to one’s sexuality, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. SRHR, in its comprehensive and holistic sense, is central and fundamental to people’s health and well-being. The comprehensive nature of the SRHR agenda must be duly reflected in the future EU-Africa pillar of the EU-ACP post-2020 agreement. This factsheet includes recommendations on how the EU-Africa partnership could integrate and recognise a fully SRHR perspective. For a full overview over the current status of implementation of continental commitments on women’s and girls’ rights in Africa read this report.

State of African Women Report
Resource

| 29 November 2019

Sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU-Africa partnership

The Cotonou Partnership Agreement (CPA) between the European Union (EU) and the group of 79 African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries will expire in February 2020. Currently, a new agreement is being negotiated. As negotiations advance, some points of diversion between both parties progressively emerge such as the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights4 (SRHR) agenda. The EU negotiation directives for a post-Cotonou agreement provides strong commitments towards SRHR, whereas the ACP negotiating mandate discards the rights component which notably implies the risk of strictly putting the focus on “service delivery” (access to quality Sexual and Reproductive Health services for all) rather than on a holistic approach (SRHR). Attaining and maintaining reproductive and sexual health implies respecting and promoting fundamental human rights, such as the right to decide the number and spacing of one’s children, the right to consensual marriage and sexual relations, the right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on matters related to one’s sexuality, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. SRHR, in its comprehensive and holistic sense, is central and fundamental to people’s health and well-being. The comprehensive nature of the SRHR agenda must be duly reflected in the future EU-Africa pillar of the EU-ACP post-2020 agreement. This factsheet includes recommendations on how the EU-Africa partnership could integrate and recognise a fully SRHR perspective. For a full overview over the current status of implementation of continental commitments on women’s and girls’ rights in Africa read this report.

Georgia youth
Resource

| 30 September 2019

Decision-makers owe young people relationship and sexuality education

IPPF EN is fighting with and for young people so that they have the chance to develop the life skills needed to foster healthier and safer relationships, based on equality and respect. Over the past few decades we have seen increased support for relationship and sexuality education with several countries in Europe and Central Asia setting an ambitious tone. Nonetheless, access to relationship and sexuality education varies widely across countries, as many governments continue to deprive young people of crucial life skills that would enable them to have happy and healthy relationships and lives. At IPPF EN, we believe that the quality of someone’s sexuality education should not be reduced to a geographical lottery. Sexist and coercive movements are spreading misinformation about relationship and sexuality education. These movements oppose efforts to break down harmful and rigid gender norms around masculinity and femininity. They attack education that promotes awareness and respect for gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual pleasure and sexual rights. In this context, IPPF Member Associations are working tirelessly to enable young people to develop knowledge and life skills that support their health and well-being - through trainings for educators, the implementation of innovative programmes outside school settings, and advocacy for mandatory relationship and sexuality education. To learn more about the work done in different countries on ensuring young people access relationship and sexuality education, read our three blog series.

Georgia youth
Resource

| 30 September 2019

Decision-makers owe young people relationship and sexuality education

IPPF EN is fighting with and for young people so that they have the chance to develop the life skills needed to foster healthier and safer relationships, based on equality and respect. Over the past few decades we have seen increased support for relationship and sexuality education with several countries in Europe and Central Asia setting an ambitious tone. Nonetheless, access to relationship and sexuality education varies widely across countries, as many governments continue to deprive young people of crucial life skills that would enable them to have happy and healthy relationships and lives. At IPPF EN, we believe that the quality of someone’s sexuality education should not be reduced to a geographical lottery. Sexist and coercive movements are spreading misinformation about relationship and sexuality education. These movements oppose efforts to break down harmful and rigid gender norms around masculinity and femininity. They attack education that promotes awareness and respect for gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual pleasure and sexual rights. In this context, IPPF Member Associations are working tirelessly to enable young people to develop knowledge and life skills that support their health and well-being - through trainings for educators, the implementation of innovative programmes outside school settings, and advocacy for mandatory relationship and sexuality education. To learn more about the work done in different countries on ensuring young people access relationship and sexuality education, read our three blog series.

gender equality and SRHR in the EU
Resource

| 19 July 2019

How can you, as a MEP, promote gender equality and sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU?

In 2019-2024, we call on Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) to ensure that all Europeans can lead free and safe private and family lives, in a society free from sexism and discrimination. This paper lays down the areas where the EU has internal competences and where MEPs have the power to act.   Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) have a critical role in promoting SRHR in EU external action and upholding the right of young women and men around the world to lead safe and dignified lives, free from coercion and harm. These are just some of the steps MEPs can take to champion SRHR.

gender equality and SRHR in the EU
Resource

| 19 July 2019

How can you, as a MEP, promote gender equality and sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU?

In 2019-2024, we call on Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) to ensure that all Europeans can lead free and safe private and family lives, in a society free from sexism and discrimination. This paper lays down the areas where the EU has internal competences and where MEPs have the power to act.   Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) have a critical role in promoting SRHR in EU external action and upholding the right of young women and men around the world to lead safe and dignified lives, free from coercion and harm. These are just some of the steps MEPs can take to champion SRHR.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 09 July 2019

Financial Statements 2018

Income for the year for the group increased by US$9.5 million (9%)to US$111.9 million due to a large increase in restricted income from US$30.3 million to US$54.1 million netted off against a decrease in unrestricted income of US$14.3 million.  Total group expenditure increased by US$21.6 million to US$114.6 million which led to a group net operating deficit (combined for unrestricted and restricted funds) for the year of US$2.6 million. Total unrestricted expenditure of US$74.8 million includes grants to member associations and partners (US$42.0 million), group secretariat expenditure (US$28.9 million), and fundraising costs(US$3.3 million). The net operating unrestricted deficit for the year was US$17.0 million (2017 surplus: US$8.8 million). Total restricted expenditure of US$39.8 million includes grants to member associations and partners (US$25.2 million), group secretariat expenditure (US$14.0 million), and fundraising costs (US$0.5 million). There was a restricted surplus of US$14.4 million.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 09 July 2019

Financial Statements 2018

Income for the year for the group increased by US$9.5 million (9%)to US$111.9 million due to a large increase in restricted income from US$30.3 million to US$54.1 million netted off against a decrease in unrestricted income of US$14.3 million.  Total group expenditure increased by US$21.6 million to US$114.6 million which led to a group net operating deficit (combined for unrestricted and restricted funds) for the year of US$2.6 million. Total unrestricted expenditure of US$74.8 million includes grants to member associations and partners (US$42.0 million), group secretariat expenditure (US$28.9 million), and fundraising costs(US$3.3 million). The net operating unrestricted deficit for the year was US$17.0 million (2017 surplus: US$8.8 million). Total restricted expenditure of US$39.8 million includes grants to member associations and partners (US$25.2 million), group secretariat expenditure (US$14.0 million), and fundraising costs (US$0.5 million). There was a restricted surplus of US$14.4 million.

See The Cost
Resource

| 24 June 2019

Make gender equality a reality: Sexual and reproductive rights are key aspects of health and well-being for all people

We can't achieve gender equality without having access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).  SRHR underpin the health and well-being of all Europeans, from access to contraceptives and abortion care, sexual health services, relationships and sexuality education, to being protected from violence and coercion, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. However, access to SRHR varies greatly within and between EU Member States, which is particularly harmful to those in the most vulnerable situations. Furthermore, recent years have seen a rise of coercive movements both within and outside of the EU, with gender equality, women’s rights and reproductive freedom increasingly under attack. This paper lays down the steps to be taken to counter future such attempts that seek to restrict reproductive freedom and gender equality.

See The Cost
Resource

| 24 June 2019

Make gender equality a reality: Sexual and reproductive rights are key aspects of health and well-being for all people

We can't achieve gender equality without having access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).  SRHR underpin the health and well-being of all Europeans, from access to contraceptives and abortion care, sexual health services, relationships and sexuality education, to being protected from violence and coercion, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. However, access to SRHR varies greatly within and between EU Member States, which is particularly harmful to those in the most vulnerable situations. Furthermore, recent years have seen a rise of coercive movements both within and outside of the EU, with gender equality, women’s rights and reproductive freedom increasingly under attack. This paper lays down the steps to be taken to counter future such attempts that seek to restrict reproductive freedom and gender equality.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 28 May 2019

All people deserve to lead free and safe sexual and reproductive lives

Sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) underpin the health and well-being of all Europeans, from access to contraceptive and abortion care, sexual health services, and comprehensive sexuality education, to being protected from violence and coercion, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. When people are denied universal access to SRHR, achieving gender equality is impossible. Unfortunately, in 2019, access to these rights varies greatly within and between EU Member States (MS), which is particularly harmful to those in the most vulnerable situations. SRHR are increasingly under threat, with the rise of illiberal coercive movements against gender equality, women’s and LGBTI rights, and a shrinking civil society space within the EU. This paper lays down what MEPs can do to champion sexual and reproductive health and rights. It is available in English, Spanish, French, Dutch, Romanian and Greek.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 28 May 2019

All people deserve to lead free and safe sexual and reproductive lives

Sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) underpin the health and well-being of all Europeans, from access to contraceptive and abortion care, sexual health services, and comprehensive sexuality education, to being protected from violence and coercion, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. When people are denied universal access to SRHR, achieving gender equality is impossible. Unfortunately, in 2019, access to these rights varies greatly within and between EU Member States (MS), which is particularly harmful to those in the most vulnerable situations. SRHR are increasingly under threat, with the rise of illiberal coercive movements against gender equality, women’s and LGBTI rights, and a shrinking civil society space within the EU. This paper lays down what MEPs can do to champion sexual and reproductive health and rights. It is available in English, Spanish, French, Dutch, Romanian and Greek.