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European Central Asia

Resources

Latest resources from across the Federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

Youth Voices, Youth Choices research report front cover

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, North Macedonia, Kosovo

Resource

Youth access to SRH information, education and care in the Balkans in COVID times

NEW: Our regional policy recommendations call on decision-makers to uphold young people's sexual and reproductive health and rights as we build back post-COVID.
Image of gynaecological medical setting
Resource

| 22 November 2022

Gynaecological and Obstetric Violence - a form of GBV

The widespread and systemic mistreatment and violence against women experienced during childbirth and other reproductive health services has gained international visibility in recent years, following pioneering work in several Latin American countries to recognise and criminalise this form of gender-based violence.   International institutions have also spoken out on the issue. In 2014, gynaecological and obstetric violence was acknowledged by the World Health Organisation, and in 2019 the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women described it as a “serious violation of women’s human rights occurring across all geographical and income-level settings”. In Europe, the parliaments of the Council of Europe and of the European Union have very recently adopted resolutions drawing attention to this phenomenon and calling for national and European measures to tackle it. But to date, no national government has put in place legislation specifically to criminalise gynaecological and obstetric violence. This means that currently, people living in EU Member States have few legal protections or means of redress.  With this in mind, IPPF EN produced this research and policy paper to provide an outline of the systemic and widespread nature of gynaecological and obstetric violence across many countries in Europe, and make recommendations to European and national decision-makers to tackle this form of gender-based violence. 2-pager summary of the paper on OBGYN violence coming soon! Check out IPPF EN's Safe From Harm campaign, highlighting the EU action we support to combat gender-based violence. 

Image of gynaecological medical setting
Resource

| 22 November 2022

Gynaecological and Obstetric Violence - a form of GBV

The widespread and systemic mistreatment and violence against women experienced during childbirth and other reproductive health services has gained international visibility in recent years, following pioneering work in several Latin American countries to recognise and criminalise this form of gender-based violence.   International institutions have also spoken out on the issue. In 2014, gynaecological and obstetric violence was acknowledged by the World Health Organisation, and in 2019 the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women described it as a “serious violation of women’s human rights occurring across all geographical and income-level settings”. In Europe, the parliaments of the Council of Europe and of the European Union have very recently adopted resolutions drawing attention to this phenomenon and calling for national and European measures to tackle it. But to date, no national government has put in place legislation specifically to criminalise gynaecological and obstetric violence. This means that currently, people living in EU Member States have few legal protections or means of redress.  With this in mind, IPPF EN produced this research and policy paper to provide an outline of the systemic and widespread nature of gynaecological and obstetric violence across many countries in Europe, and make recommendations to European and national decision-makers to tackle this form of gender-based violence. 2-pager summary of the paper on OBGYN violence coming soon! Check out IPPF EN's Safe From Harm campaign, highlighting the EU action we support to combat gender-based violence. 

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 30 November 2017

Photo Gallery: Rising HIV numbers and funding cutbacks - Macedonia at the crossroads

This article was written in September 2017. Since then, thanks to the work of NGOs including our member HERA, Macedonia’s government has committed to providing long-term funding for all HIV programmes for marginalised people. Although HIV prevalence is low in Macedonia, with only 151 people registered as living with HIV, these small numbers mask a complex picture, and one that is rapidly changing. In 2016, there were 40 new HIV diagnoses, the majority of them among men who have sex with men.  Macedonia is not alone in facing a rise in HIV cases. In many parts of Central and Eastern Europe, the rate of new infections is growing. Between 2010 and 2015, the region saw a 50 per cent rise in new HIV infections annually. Another looming problem that threatens to send Macedonian HIV rates spiralling upwards is a funding crisis precipitated by donor cutbacks and political uncertainty. Between 2004 and 2016, Macedonian HIV programmes received almost $25 million from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Much of this money was channelled into HIV prevention, funding NGOs that target those deemed most vulnerable to infection – sex workers, people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men and prisoners. But in 2016 this funding was phased out and NGOs on the frontline are left hoping that the new government will deliver fully on a recent commitment to step in with similar levels of funding in 2018. In the chasm left by the country’s public healthcare system, Macedonia’s sexual health and rights NGOs work tirelessly to plug the gap, often on a shoestring and in an increasingly uncertain funding landscape. HERA, IPPF's member in Macedonia, is a leading NGO providing free HIV testing services, sexual health support and advocacy. It works closely with smaller organisations around the country to ensure support for young people, sex workers, people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men. These NGOs are many people’s first port of call for HIV tests and other vital health care.  

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 30 November 2017

Photo Gallery: Rising HIV numbers and funding cutbacks - Macedonia at the crossroads

This article was written in September 2017. Since then, thanks to the work of NGOs including our member HERA, Macedonia’s government has committed to providing long-term funding for all HIV programmes for marginalised people. Although HIV prevalence is low in Macedonia, with only 151 people registered as living with HIV, these small numbers mask a complex picture, and one that is rapidly changing. In 2016, there were 40 new HIV diagnoses, the majority of them among men who have sex with men.  Macedonia is not alone in facing a rise in HIV cases. In many parts of Central and Eastern Europe, the rate of new infections is growing. Between 2010 and 2015, the region saw a 50 per cent rise in new HIV infections annually. Another looming problem that threatens to send Macedonian HIV rates spiralling upwards is a funding crisis precipitated by donor cutbacks and political uncertainty. Between 2004 and 2016, Macedonian HIV programmes received almost $25 million from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Much of this money was channelled into HIV prevention, funding NGOs that target those deemed most vulnerable to infection – sex workers, people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men and prisoners. But in 2016 this funding was phased out and NGOs on the frontline are left hoping that the new government will deliver fully on a recent commitment to step in with similar levels of funding in 2018. In the chasm left by the country’s public healthcare system, Macedonia’s sexual health and rights NGOs work tirelessly to plug the gap, often on a shoestring and in an increasingly uncertain funding landscape. HERA, IPPF's member in Macedonia, is a leading NGO providing free HIV testing services, sexual health support and advocacy. It works closely with smaller organisations around the country to ensure support for young people, sex workers, people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men. These NGOs are many people’s first port of call for HIV tests and other vital health care.  

Image of gynaecological medical setting
Resource

| 22 November 2022

Gynaecological and Obstetric Violence - a form of GBV

The widespread and systemic mistreatment and violence against women experienced during childbirth and other reproductive health services has gained international visibility in recent years, following pioneering work in several Latin American countries to recognise and criminalise this form of gender-based violence.   International institutions have also spoken out on the issue. In 2014, gynaecological and obstetric violence was acknowledged by the World Health Organisation, and in 2019 the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women described it as a “serious violation of women’s human rights occurring across all geographical and income-level settings”. In Europe, the parliaments of the Council of Europe and of the European Union have very recently adopted resolutions drawing attention to this phenomenon and calling for national and European measures to tackle it. But to date, no national government has put in place legislation specifically to criminalise gynaecological and obstetric violence. This means that currently, people living in EU Member States have few legal protections or means of redress.  With this in mind, IPPF EN produced this research and policy paper to provide an outline of the systemic and widespread nature of gynaecological and obstetric violence across many countries in Europe, and make recommendations to European and national decision-makers to tackle this form of gender-based violence. 2-pager summary of the paper on OBGYN violence coming soon! Check out IPPF EN's Safe From Harm campaign, highlighting the EU action we support to combat gender-based violence. 

Image of gynaecological medical setting
Resource

| 22 November 2022

Gynaecological and Obstetric Violence - a form of GBV

The widespread and systemic mistreatment and violence against women experienced during childbirth and other reproductive health services has gained international visibility in recent years, following pioneering work in several Latin American countries to recognise and criminalise this form of gender-based violence.   International institutions have also spoken out on the issue. In 2014, gynaecological and obstetric violence was acknowledged by the World Health Organisation, and in 2019 the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women described it as a “serious violation of women’s human rights occurring across all geographical and income-level settings”. In Europe, the parliaments of the Council of Europe and of the European Union have very recently adopted resolutions drawing attention to this phenomenon and calling for national and European measures to tackle it. But to date, no national government has put in place legislation specifically to criminalise gynaecological and obstetric violence. This means that currently, people living in EU Member States have few legal protections or means of redress.  With this in mind, IPPF EN produced this research and policy paper to provide an outline of the systemic and widespread nature of gynaecological and obstetric violence across many countries in Europe, and make recommendations to European and national decision-makers to tackle this form of gender-based violence. 2-pager summary of the paper on OBGYN violence coming soon! Check out IPPF EN's Safe From Harm campaign, highlighting the EU action we support to combat gender-based violence. 

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 30 November 2017

Photo Gallery: Rising HIV numbers and funding cutbacks - Macedonia at the crossroads

This article was written in September 2017. Since then, thanks to the work of NGOs including our member HERA, Macedonia’s government has committed to providing long-term funding for all HIV programmes for marginalised people. Although HIV prevalence is low in Macedonia, with only 151 people registered as living with HIV, these small numbers mask a complex picture, and one that is rapidly changing. In 2016, there were 40 new HIV diagnoses, the majority of them among men who have sex with men.  Macedonia is not alone in facing a rise in HIV cases. In many parts of Central and Eastern Europe, the rate of new infections is growing. Between 2010 and 2015, the region saw a 50 per cent rise in new HIV infections annually. Another looming problem that threatens to send Macedonian HIV rates spiralling upwards is a funding crisis precipitated by donor cutbacks and political uncertainty. Between 2004 and 2016, Macedonian HIV programmes received almost $25 million from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Much of this money was channelled into HIV prevention, funding NGOs that target those deemed most vulnerable to infection – sex workers, people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men and prisoners. But in 2016 this funding was phased out and NGOs on the frontline are left hoping that the new government will deliver fully on a recent commitment to step in with similar levels of funding in 2018. In the chasm left by the country’s public healthcare system, Macedonia’s sexual health and rights NGOs work tirelessly to plug the gap, often on a shoestring and in an increasingly uncertain funding landscape. HERA, IPPF's member in Macedonia, is a leading NGO providing free HIV testing services, sexual health support and advocacy. It works closely with smaller organisations around the country to ensure support for young people, sex workers, people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men. These NGOs are many people’s first port of call for HIV tests and other vital health care.  

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_2.jpg
Resource

| 30 November 2017

Photo Gallery: Rising HIV numbers and funding cutbacks - Macedonia at the crossroads

This article was written in September 2017. Since then, thanks to the work of NGOs including our member HERA, Macedonia’s government has committed to providing long-term funding for all HIV programmes for marginalised people. Although HIV prevalence is low in Macedonia, with only 151 people registered as living with HIV, these small numbers mask a complex picture, and one that is rapidly changing. In 2016, there were 40 new HIV diagnoses, the majority of them among men who have sex with men.  Macedonia is not alone in facing a rise in HIV cases. In many parts of Central and Eastern Europe, the rate of new infections is growing. Between 2010 and 2015, the region saw a 50 per cent rise in new HIV infections annually. Another looming problem that threatens to send Macedonian HIV rates spiralling upwards is a funding crisis precipitated by donor cutbacks and political uncertainty. Between 2004 and 2016, Macedonian HIV programmes received almost $25 million from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Much of this money was channelled into HIV prevention, funding NGOs that target those deemed most vulnerable to infection – sex workers, people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men and prisoners. But in 2016 this funding was phased out and NGOs on the frontline are left hoping that the new government will deliver fully on a recent commitment to step in with similar levels of funding in 2018. In the chasm left by the country’s public healthcare system, Macedonia’s sexual health and rights NGOs work tirelessly to plug the gap, often on a shoestring and in an increasingly uncertain funding landscape. HERA, IPPF's member in Macedonia, is a leading NGO providing free HIV testing services, sexual health support and advocacy. It works closely with smaller organisations around the country to ensure support for young people, sex workers, people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men. These NGOs are many people’s first port of call for HIV tests and other vital health care.