- - -
European Central Asia

Resources

Latest resources from across the Federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

Youth Voices, Youth Choices research report front cover

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, North Macedonia, Kosovo

Resource

Youth access to SRH information, education and care in the Balkans in COVID times

NEW: Our regional policy recommendations call on decision-makers to uphold young people's sexual and reproductive health and rights as we build back post-COVID.

Filter our resources by:

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_9.jpg
Resource

| 07 October 2015

Policy Briefs on Sexuality Education

The Federal Centre for Health Education BZgA in Germany, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA Regional Office for Eastern Europe and Central Asia), and the World Health Organisation (WHO Regional Office for Europe) with input from various experts, including representatives from IPPF EN Member Associations, jointly develop a series of policy briefs on sexuality education. The first two issues have now been released and answer the questions: - What is sexuality education? - And what is the impact of sexuality education? The policy briefs are targeted to politicians and other decision makers, primarily in Europe and Central Asia, and provide them with short and comprehensive information on different issues regarding sexuality education. As an advocacy tool, the policy briefs promote good quality sexuality education as an effective life-course intervention which supports children and young people in protecting their sexual health and general well-being. Policy brief No. 1 provides background information on the history, the benefits and the rights-based approach of sexuality education and further discusses myths and facts in this field. It argues that children and young people can greatly benefit from good quality sexuality education, which are age and development appropriate. Policy brief No. 2 summarises the scientific evidence regarding the impact of sexuality education on the sexual health and well-being of children and young people. In this regard, it explores public health-related indicators but also so called “soft outcomes” of sexuality education, such as the development of a positive attitude towards sexuality, as well as skills in communication, decision-making and critical thinking.  It is also possible to order hard copies from BZgA.  

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_9.jpg
Resource

| 07 October 2015

Policy Briefs on Sexuality Education

The Federal Centre for Health Education BZgA in Germany, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA Regional Office for Eastern Europe and Central Asia), and the World Health Organisation (WHO Regional Office for Europe) with input from various experts, including representatives from IPPF EN Member Associations, jointly develop a series of policy briefs on sexuality education. The first two issues have now been released and answer the questions: - What is sexuality education? - And what is the impact of sexuality education? The policy briefs are targeted to politicians and other decision makers, primarily in Europe and Central Asia, and provide them with short and comprehensive information on different issues regarding sexuality education. As an advocacy tool, the policy briefs promote good quality sexuality education as an effective life-course intervention which supports children and young people in protecting their sexual health and general well-being. Policy brief No. 1 provides background information on the history, the benefits and the rights-based approach of sexuality education and further discusses myths and facts in this field. It argues that children and young people can greatly benefit from good quality sexuality education, which are age and development appropriate. Policy brief No. 2 summarises the scientific evidence regarding the impact of sexuality education on the sexual health and well-being of children and young people. In this regard, it explores public health-related indicators but also so called “soft outcomes” of sexuality education, such as the development of a positive attitude towards sexuality, as well as skills in communication, decision-making and critical thinking.  It is also possible to order hard copies from BZgA.  

IPPF EN Annual Report 2014
Resource

| 28 June 2015

Annual Report 2014

We are proud of so many achievements in 2014. Drawing on the huge wealth of experience inside our incredibly diverse network of activists for sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF EN has continued our fight to bring change and new possibilities for ordinary people. For example, the groundbreaking work we are doing to empower young people with learning disabilities is changing lives in 12 countries. We have succeeded in using legal instruments to ensure people are treated with dignity and receive the services they need. We have continued challenging gender stereotypes and patriarchal social norms to help ensure that young people are able to reach their full potential. And our advocates have worked passionately to make the case for ambitious international commitments to ensuring greater equality and tackling poverty in the coming decades. Download our Annual Report to read more about our work and its impact throughout Europe and Central Asia in 2014.

IPPF EN Annual Report 2014
Resource

| 28 June 2015

Annual Report 2014

We are proud of so many achievements in 2014. Drawing on the huge wealth of experience inside our incredibly diverse network of activists for sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF EN has continued our fight to bring change and new possibilities for ordinary people. For example, the groundbreaking work we are doing to empower young people with learning disabilities is changing lives in 12 countries. We have succeeded in using legal instruments to ensure people are treated with dignity and receive the services they need. We have continued challenging gender stereotypes and patriarchal social norms to help ensure that young people are able to reach their full potential. And our advocates have worked passionately to make the case for ambitious international commitments to ensuring greater equality and tackling poverty in the coming decades. Download our Annual Report to read more about our work and its impact throughout Europe and Central Asia in 2014.

Burundi_Ngozi_60640_IPPF_Georgina Goodwin_Burundi_IPPF.jpg
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2016-2022

  Strategic Framework 2016–2022 is a bold and aspirational vision of what the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) plans to achieve, and how we will achieve it, over the next seven years. It is the culmination of an extensive global consultative process involving Member Associations, partners and donors, and was approved by IPPF’s highest decision-making body, the Governing Council, in November 2014. Our strategy responds to social, political and demographic global trends. These include: the expectations and potential of the largest ever generation of young people; ongoing, significant social and economic inequalities, including discrimination against girls and women; and opposition that threatens gains in human rights. It is also guided by evaluations and analyses of our work – strengths, weaknesses, capacities, resources and networks. IPPF’s Strategic Framework sets the priorities that will allow the Federation to deliver impact as a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement over the next seven years. It will guide national Member Associations and partners in formulating their own country-specific strategies, based on their resources and tailored to serve the most marginalized groups in local contexts. It also provides focus to the Secretariat in its international influencing and in its support to Member Associations. Progress in delivering the Strategic Framework will be measured through a dashboard of global results and Member Associations will report on these indicators on an annual basis. With this essential tool, IPPF is equipped to move forward and deliver on its promises. At the helm of the sexual and reproductive health and rights movement, we will help unite the actions and achievements of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions around the world to realize a step change in sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world.

Burundi_Ngozi_60640_IPPF_Georgina Goodwin_Burundi_IPPF.jpg
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2016-2022

  Strategic Framework 2016–2022 is a bold and aspirational vision of what the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) plans to achieve, and how we will achieve it, over the next seven years. It is the culmination of an extensive global consultative process involving Member Associations, partners and donors, and was approved by IPPF’s highest decision-making body, the Governing Council, in November 2014. Our strategy responds to social, political and demographic global trends. These include: the expectations and potential of the largest ever generation of young people; ongoing, significant social and economic inequalities, including discrimination against girls and women; and opposition that threatens gains in human rights. It is also guided by evaluations and analyses of our work – strengths, weaknesses, capacities, resources and networks. IPPF’s Strategic Framework sets the priorities that will allow the Federation to deliver impact as a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement over the next seven years. It will guide national Member Associations and partners in formulating their own country-specific strategies, based on their resources and tailored to serve the most marginalized groups in local contexts. It also provides focus to the Secretariat in its international influencing and in its support to Member Associations. Progress in delivering the Strategic Framework will be measured through a dashboard of global results and Member Associations will report on these indicators on an annual basis. With this essential tool, IPPF is equipped to move forward and deliver on its promises. At the helm of the sexual and reproductive health and rights movement, we will help unite the actions and achievements of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions around the world to realize a step change in sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_13.jpg
Resource

| 16 March 2015

Vision 2020 Gender Report

The second report in our Vision 2020 series, this publication, "SRHR- the key to gender equality and women’s empowerment" sets out how SRHR is critical to gender equality and women’s empowerment across three dimensions. It explores how ensuring universal access to SRHR can promote economic growth, social equity and political participation. Pathways of empowerment This report examines the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality. It explores the different pathways of empowerment that girls and women experience, and analyzes how these pathways are affected by sexual and reproductive health and rights. Policy focus and attention given to gender equality and women’s empowerment has been growing over the last decade, and there are some areas where links are established more conclusively. Although there is strong documentation on the health benefits of investment in sexual and reproductive health, until recently the non‑medical benefits, such as higher levels of social and political participation, have been largely ignored, partly because they are difficult to measure. While the social and economic implications of sexual and reproductive health and rights are often overlooked, they are no less real. More attention is needed to explore the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and other critical areas relating to gender equality, such as the representation of women in political and public life. Methodology and priority themes For the purposes of this report, and in line with accepted wisdom on emerging areas of priority, we focus on the following core areas relating to gender equality: 1) equality in social development, 2) economic participation and 3) participation in political and public life. Within each area, we discuss key links with sexual and reproductive health and rights as well as identifying ways in which these links contribute to empowerment experienced by girls and women. IPPF carried out desk reviews of existing policy research: over 350 references were reviewed on the following focus areas: „ sexual and reproductive health and rights and the social development of girls and women (including health, education, and freedom from sexual and gender-based violence)  sexual and reproductive health and rights and women’s economic participation sexual and reproductive health and rights and women’s participation in political and public life    Resources were gathered for review using three main methods:  1) electronic database searching,  2) cross-referencing of reference lists of related articles and reviews and  3) consultation with experts in the fields of sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality.  Papers were prioritized for inclusion if they met a number of criteria: if they appeared to provide a clear international policy overview of key review themes and evidence given from a rights-based perspective, with statistically proven linkages, case studies and/or findings from qualitative studies; were published recently, and within the last 10 years; were published in English; corresponded most closely to agreed keyword searches; and were cited widely.  During the first phase, these methods were used to search the libraries of an agreed group of multi‑lateral institutions; key donors and governments; non‑governmental organizations working in the fields of sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender equality and development; and key global and regional partnerships. Findings were then verified and enriched, with gaps identified and filled, using searches in relevant public health and gender journals, along with regional and national policy reports and studies that fitted the search criteria closely and/or that came recommended.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_13.jpg
Resource

| 16 March 2015

Vision 2020 Gender Report

The second report in our Vision 2020 series, this publication, "SRHR- the key to gender equality and women’s empowerment" sets out how SRHR is critical to gender equality and women’s empowerment across three dimensions. It explores how ensuring universal access to SRHR can promote economic growth, social equity and political participation. Pathways of empowerment This report examines the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality. It explores the different pathways of empowerment that girls and women experience, and analyzes how these pathways are affected by sexual and reproductive health and rights. Policy focus and attention given to gender equality and women’s empowerment has been growing over the last decade, and there are some areas where links are established more conclusively. Although there is strong documentation on the health benefits of investment in sexual and reproductive health, until recently the non‑medical benefits, such as higher levels of social and political participation, have been largely ignored, partly because they are difficult to measure. While the social and economic implications of sexual and reproductive health and rights are often overlooked, they are no less real. More attention is needed to explore the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and other critical areas relating to gender equality, such as the representation of women in political and public life. Methodology and priority themes For the purposes of this report, and in line with accepted wisdom on emerging areas of priority, we focus on the following core areas relating to gender equality: 1) equality in social development, 2) economic participation and 3) participation in political and public life. Within each area, we discuss key links with sexual and reproductive health and rights as well as identifying ways in which these links contribute to empowerment experienced by girls and women. IPPF carried out desk reviews of existing policy research: over 350 references were reviewed on the following focus areas: „ sexual and reproductive health and rights and the social development of girls and women (including health, education, and freedom from sexual and gender-based violence)  sexual and reproductive health and rights and women’s economic participation sexual and reproductive health and rights and women’s participation in political and public life    Resources were gathered for review using three main methods:  1) electronic database searching,  2) cross-referencing of reference lists of related articles and reviews and  3) consultation with experts in the fields of sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality.  Papers were prioritized for inclusion if they met a number of criteria: if they appeared to provide a clear international policy overview of key review themes and evidence given from a rights-based perspective, with statistically proven linkages, case studies and/or findings from qualitative studies; were published recently, and within the last 10 years; were published in English; corresponded most closely to agreed keyword searches; and were cited widely.  During the first phase, these methods were used to search the libraries of an agreed group of multi‑lateral institutions; key donors and governments; non‑governmental organizations working in the fields of sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender equality and development; and key global and regional partnerships. Findings were then verified and enriched, with gaps identified and filled, using searches in relevant public health and gender journals, along with regional and national policy reports and studies that fitted the search criteria closely and/or that came recommended.

Barometer cover picture contraceptive access
Resource

| 15 January 2015

Women's access to modern contraceptive choice - Barometer 2015

A ‘Barometer’ report launched by IPPF EN in 2015 analyses how easily women in 16 EU countries can access modern contraceptives. It finds that overall, the situation in most countries has stagnated or worsened in recent years. The EU countries covered by the report are: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, and Sweden. Information on participating national partners can be found in the report. The report’s findings are based on information about the national policy landscapes provided by national experts in each of the 16 countries, using a series of policy benchmarks that are key to ensuring access to modern contraceptives. The information was collected, analysed and reviewed between May and November 2014. The report is endorsed by the European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health (ESC) and International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH).

Barometer cover picture contraceptive access
Resource

| 15 January 2015

Women's access to modern contraceptive choice - Barometer 2015

A ‘Barometer’ report launched by IPPF EN in 2015 analyses how easily women in 16 EU countries can access modern contraceptives. It finds that overall, the situation in most countries has stagnated or worsened in recent years. The EU countries covered by the report are: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, and Sweden. Information on participating national partners can be found in the report. The report’s findings are based on information about the national policy landscapes provided by national experts in each of the 16 countries, using a series of policy benchmarks that are key to ensuring access to modern contraceptives. The information was collected, analysed and reviewed between May and November 2014. The report is endorsed by the European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health (ESC) and International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH).

Barometer call to action
Resource

| 10 January 2015

Call to Action: Women's access to modern contraceptive choice - Barometer 2015

We call on national decision-makers to support the implementation of a comprehensive approach to contraceptive choice in the 16 countries within a broader sexual and reproductive health and rights agenda. This is fundamental to ensuring the wellbeing of all women and girls, particularly the most vulnerable and is a crucial precondition to allowing women and couples the freedom to choose parenthood or not. It is a competence of EU Member States to formulate and implement SRHR policies at a national level. Yet when it comes to public health and non-discrimination, the EU can exercise policy-making, foster research and the exchange of best practices, and better support the implementation of SRHR at national level. Therefore, the Barometer partners call for a structured dialogue involving all relevant stakeholders at EU and national levels. Additionally, we urge the EU to make a greater investment in SRHR research and data collection.  

Barometer call to action
Resource

| 10 January 2015

Call to Action: Women's access to modern contraceptive choice - Barometer 2015

We call on national decision-makers to support the implementation of a comprehensive approach to contraceptive choice in the 16 countries within a broader sexual and reproductive health and rights agenda. This is fundamental to ensuring the wellbeing of all women and girls, particularly the most vulnerable and is a crucial precondition to allowing women and couples the freedom to choose parenthood or not. It is a competence of EU Member States to formulate and implement SRHR policies at a national level. Yet when it comes to public health and non-discrimination, the EU can exercise policy-making, foster research and the exchange of best practices, and better support the implementation of SRHR at national level. Therefore, the Barometer partners call for a structured dialogue involving all relevant stakeholders at EU and national levels. Additionally, we urge the EU to make a greater investment in SRHR research and data collection.  

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_9.jpg
Resource

| 07 October 2015

Policy Briefs on Sexuality Education

The Federal Centre for Health Education BZgA in Germany, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA Regional Office for Eastern Europe and Central Asia), and the World Health Organisation (WHO Regional Office for Europe) with input from various experts, including representatives from IPPF EN Member Associations, jointly develop a series of policy briefs on sexuality education. The first two issues have now been released and answer the questions: - What is sexuality education? - And what is the impact of sexuality education? The policy briefs are targeted to politicians and other decision makers, primarily in Europe and Central Asia, and provide them with short and comprehensive information on different issues regarding sexuality education. As an advocacy tool, the policy briefs promote good quality sexuality education as an effective life-course intervention which supports children and young people in protecting their sexual health and general well-being. Policy brief No. 1 provides background information on the history, the benefits and the rights-based approach of sexuality education and further discusses myths and facts in this field. It argues that children and young people can greatly benefit from good quality sexuality education, which are age and development appropriate. Policy brief No. 2 summarises the scientific evidence regarding the impact of sexuality education on the sexual health and well-being of children and young people. In this regard, it explores public health-related indicators but also so called “soft outcomes” of sexuality education, such as the development of a positive attitude towards sexuality, as well as skills in communication, decision-making and critical thinking.  It is also possible to order hard copies from BZgA.  

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_9.jpg
Resource

| 07 October 2015

Policy Briefs on Sexuality Education

The Federal Centre for Health Education BZgA in Germany, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA Regional Office for Eastern Europe and Central Asia), and the World Health Organisation (WHO Regional Office for Europe) with input from various experts, including representatives from IPPF EN Member Associations, jointly develop a series of policy briefs on sexuality education. The first two issues have now been released and answer the questions: - What is sexuality education? - And what is the impact of sexuality education? The policy briefs are targeted to politicians and other decision makers, primarily in Europe and Central Asia, and provide them with short and comprehensive information on different issues regarding sexuality education. As an advocacy tool, the policy briefs promote good quality sexuality education as an effective life-course intervention which supports children and young people in protecting their sexual health and general well-being. Policy brief No. 1 provides background information on the history, the benefits and the rights-based approach of sexuality education and further discusses myths and facts in this field. It argues that children and young people can greatly benefit from good quality sexuality education, which are age and development appropriate. Policy brief No. 2 summarises the scientific evidence regarding the impact of sexuality education on the sexual health and well-being of children and young people. In this regard, it explores public health-related indicators but also so called “soft outcomes” of sexuality education, such as the development of a positive attitude towards sexuality, as well as skills in communication, decision-making and critical thinking.  It is also possible to order hard copies from BZgA.  

IPPF EN Annual Report 2014
Resource

| 28 June 2015

Annual Report 2014

We are proud of so many achievements in 2014. Drawing on the huge wealth of experience inside our incredibly diverse network of activists for sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF EN has continued our fight to bring change and new possibilities for ordinary people. For example, the groundbreaking work we are doing to empower young people with learning disabilities is changing lives in 12 countries. We have succeeded in using legal instruments to ensure people are treated with dignity and receive the services they need. We have continued challenging gender stereotypes and patriarchal social norms to help ensure that young people are able to reach their full potential. And our advocates have worked passionately to make the case for ambitious international commitments to ensuring greater equality and tackling poverty in the coming decades. Download our Annual Report to read more about our work and its impact throughout Europe and Central Asia in 2014.

IPPF EN Annual Report 2014
Resource

| 28 June 2015

Annual Report 2014

We are proud of so many achievements in 2014. Drawing on the huge wealth of experience inside our incredibly diverse network of activists for sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF EN has continued our fight to bring change and new possibilities for ordinary people. For example, the groundbreaking work we are doing to empower young people with learning disabilities is changing lives in 12 countries. We have succeeded in using legal instruments to ensure people are treated with dignity and receive the services they need. We have continued challenging gender stereotypes and patriarchal social norms to help ensure that young people are able to reach their full potential. And our advocates have worked passionately to make the case for ambitious international commitments to ensuring greater equality and tackling poverty in the coming decades. Download our Annual Report to read more about our work and its impact throughout Europe and Central Asia in 2014.

Burundi_Ngozi_60640_IPPF_Georgina Goodwin_Burundi_IPPF.jpg
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2016-2022

  Strategic Framework 2016–2022 is a bold and aspirational vision of what the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) plans to achieve, and how we will achieve it, over the next seven years. It is the culmination of an extensive global consultative process involving Member Associations, partners and donors, and was approved by IPPF’s highest decision-making body, the Governing Council, in November 2014. Our strategy responds to social, political and demographic global trends. These include: the expectations and potential of the largest ever generation of young people; ongoing, significant social and economic inequalities, including discrimination against girls and women; and opposition that threatens gains in human rights. It is also guided by evaluations and analyses of our work – strengths, weaknesses, capacities, resources and networks. IPPF’s Strategic Framework sets the priorities that will allow the Federation to deliver impact as a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement over the next seven years. It will guide national Member Associations and partners in formulating their own country-specific strategies, based on their resources and tailored to serve the most marginalized groups in local contexts. It also provides focus to the Secretariat in its international influencing and in its support to Member Associations. Progress in delivering the Strategic Framework will be measured through a dashboard of global results and Member Associations will report on these indicators on an annual basis. With this essential tool, IPPF is equipped to move forward and deliver on its promises. At the helm of the sexual and reproductive health and rights movement, we will help unite the actions and achievements of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions around the world to realize a step change in sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world.

Burundi_Ngozi_60640_IPPF_Georgina Goodwin_Burundi_IPPF.jpg
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2016-2022

  Strategic Framework 2016–2022 is a bold and aspirational vision of what the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) plans to achieve, and how we will achieve it, over the next seven years. It is the culmination of an extensive global consultative process involving Member Associations, partners and donors, and was approved by IPPF’s highest decision-making body, the Governing Council, in November 2014. Our strategy responds to social, political and demographic global trends. These include: the expectations and potential of the largest ever generation of young people; ongoing, significant social and economic inequalities, including discrimination against girls and women; and opposition that threatens gains in human rights. It is also guided by evaluations and analyses of our work – strengths, weaknesses, capacities, resources and networks. IPPF’s Strategic Framework sets the priorities that will allow the Federation to deliver impact as a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement over the next seven years. It will guide national Member Associations and partners in formulating their own country-specific strategies, based on their resources and tailored to serve the most marginalized groups in local contexts. It also provides focus to the Secretariat in its international influencing and in its support to Member Associations. Progress in delivering the Strategic Framework will be measured through a dashboard of global results and Member Associations will report on these indicators on an annual basis. With this essential tool, IPPF is equipped to move forward and deliver on its promises. At the helm of the sexual and reproductive health and rights movement, we will help unite the actions and achievements of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions around the world to realize a step change in sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_13.jpg
Resource

| 16 March 2015

Vision 2020 Gender Report

The second report in our Vision 2020 series, this publication, "SRHR- the key to gender equality and women’s empowerment" sets out how SRHR is critical to gender equality and women’s empowerment across three dimensions. It explores how ensuring universal access to SRHR can promote economic growth, social equity and political participation. Pathways of empowerment This report examines the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality. It explores the different pathways of empowerment that girls and women experience, and analyzes how these pathways are affected by sexual and reproductive health and rights. Policy focus and attention given to gender equality and women’s empowerment has been growing over the last decade, and there are some areas where links are established more conclusively. Although there is strong documentation on the health benefits of investment in sexual and reproductive health, until recently the non‑medical benefits, such as higher levels of social and political participation, have been largely ignored, partly because they are difficult to measure. While the social and economic implications of sexual and reproductive health and rights are often overlooked, they are no less real. More attention is needed to explore the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and other critical areas relating to gender equality, such as the representation of women in political and public life. Methodology and priority themes For the purposes of this report, and in line with accepted wisdom on emerging areas of priority, we focus on the following core areas relating to gender equality: 1) equality in social development, 2) economic participation and 3) participation in political and public life. Within each area, we discuss key links with sexual and reproductive health and rights as well as identifying ways in which these links contribute to empowerment experienced by girls and women. IPPF carried out desk reviews of existing policy research: over 350 references were reviewed on the following focus areas: „ sexual and reproductive health and rights and the social development of girls and women (including health, education, and freedom from sexual and gender-based violence)  sexual and reproductive health and rights and women’s economic participation sexual and reproductive health and rights and women’s participation in political and public life    Resources were gathered for review using three main methods:  1) electronic database searching,  2) cross-referencing of reference lists of related articles and reviews and  3) consultation with experts in the fields of sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality.  Papers were prioritized for inclusion if they met a number of criteria: if they appeared to provide a clear international policy overview of key review themes and evidence given from a rights-based perspective, with statistically proven linkages, case studies and/or findings from qualitative studies; were published recently, and within the last 10 years; were published in English; corresponded most closely to agreed keyword searches; and were cited widely.  During the first phase, these methods were used to search the libraries of an agreed group of multi‑lateral institutions; key donors and governments; non‑governmental organizations working in the fields of sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender equality and development; and key global and regional partnerships. Findings were then verified and enriched, with gaps identified and filled, using searches in relevant public health and gender journals, along with regional and national policy reports and studies that fitted the search criteria closely and/or that came recommended.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_13.jpg
Resource

| 16 March 2015

Vision 2020 Gender Report

The second report in our Vision 2020 series, this publication, "SRHR- the key to gender equality and women’s empowerment" sets out how SRHR is critical to gender equality and women’s empowerment across three dimensions. It explores how ensuring universal access to SRHR can promote economic growth, social equity and political participation. Pathways of empowerment This report examines the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality. It explores the different pathways of empowerment that girls and women experience, and analyzes how these pathways are affected by sexual and reproductive health and rights. Policy focus and attention given to gender equality and women’s empowerment has been growing over the last decade, and there are some areas where links are established more conclusively. Although there is strong documentation on the health benefits of investment in sexual and reproductive health, until recently the non‑medical benefits, such as higher levels of social and political participation, have been largely ignored, partly because they are difficult to measure. While the social and economic implications of sexual and reproductive health and rights are often overlooked, they are no less real. More attention is needed to explore the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and other critical areas relating to gender equality, such as the representation of women in political and public life. Methodology and priority themes For the purposes of this report, and in line with accepted wisdom on emerging areas of priority, we focus on the following core areas relating to gender equality: 1) equality in social development, 2) economic participation and 3) participation in political and public life. Within each area, we discuss key links with sexual and reproductive health and rights as well as identifying ways in which these links contribute to empowerment experienced by girls and women. IPPF carried out desk reviews of existing policy research: over 350 references were reviewed on the following focus areas: „ sexual and reproductive health and rights and the social development of girls and women (including health, education, and freedom from sexual and gender-based violence)  sexual and reproductive health and rights and women’s economic participation sexual and reproductive health and rights and women’s participation in political and public life    Resources were gathered for review using three main methods:  1) electronic database searching,  2) cross-referencing of reference lists of related articles and reviews and  3) consultation with experts in the fields of sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality.  Papers were prioritized for inclusion if they met a number of criteria: if they appeared to provide a clear international policy overview of key review themes and evidence given from a rights-based perspective, with statistically proven linkages, case studies and/or findings from qualitative studies; were published recently, and within the last 10 years; were published in English; corresponded most closely to agreed keyword searches; and were cited widely.  During the first phase, these methods were used to search the libraries of an agreed group of multi‑lateral institutions; key donors and governments; non‑governmental organizations working in the fields of sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender equality and development; and key global and regional partnerships. Findings were then verified and enriched, with gaps identified and filled, using searches in relevant public health and gender journals, along with regional and national policy reports and studies that fitted the search criteria closely and/or that came recommended.

Barometer cover picture contraceptive access
Resource

| 15 January 2015

Women's access to modern contraceptive choice - Barometer 2015

A ‘Barometer’ report launched by IPPF EN in 2015 analyses how easily women in 16 EU countries can access modern contraceptives. It finds that overall, the situation in most countries has stagnated or worsened in recent years. The EU countries covered by the report are: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, and Sweden. Information on participating national partners can be found in the report. The report’s findings are based on information about the national policy landscapes provided by national experts in each of the 16 countries, using a series of policy benchmarks that are key to ensuring access to modern contraceptives. The information was collected, analysed and reviewed between May and November 2014. The report is endorsed by the European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health (ESC) and International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH).

Barometer cover picture contraceptive access
Resource

| 15 January 2015

Women's access to modern contraceptive choice - Barometer 2015

A ‘Barometer’ report launched by IPPF EN in 2015 analyses how easily women in 16 EU countries can access modern contraceptives. It finds that overall, the situation in most countries has stagnated or worsened in recent years. The EU countries covered by the report are: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, and Sweden. Information on participating national partners can be found in the report. The report’s findings are based on information about the national policy landscapes provided by national experts in each of the 16 countries, using a series of policy benchmarks that are key to ensuring access to modern contraceptives. The information was collected, analysed and reviewed between May and November 2014. The report is endorsed by the European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health (ESC) and International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH).

Barometer call to action
Resource

| 10 January 2015

Call to Action: Women's access to modern contraceptive choice - Barometer 2015

We call on national decision-makers to support the implementation of a comprehensive approach to contraceptive choice in the 16 countries within a broader sexual and reproductive health and rights agenda. This is fundamental to ensuring the wellbeing of all women and girls, particularly the most vulnerable and is a crucial precondition to allowing women and couples the freedom to choose parenthood or not. It is a competence of EU Member States to formulate and implement SRHR policies at a national level. Yet when it comes to public health and non-discrimination, the EU can exercise policy-making, foster research and the exchange of best practices, and better support the implementation of SRHR at national level. Therefore, the Barometer partners call for a structured dialogue involving all relevant stakeholders at EU and national levels. Additionally, we urge the EU to make a greater investment in SRHR research and data collection.  

Barometer call to action
Resource

| 10 January 2015

Call to Action: Women's access to modern contraceptive choice - Barometer 2015

We call on national decision-makers to support the implementation of a comprehensive approach to contraceptive choice in the 16 countries within a broader sexual and reproductive health and rights agenda. This is fundamental to ensuring the wellbeing of all women and girls, particularly the most vulnerable and is a crucial precondition to allowing women and couples the freedom to choose parenthood or not. It is a competence of EU Member States to formulate and implement SRHR policies at a national level. Yet when it comes to public health and non-discrimination, the EU can exercise policy-making, foster research and the exchange of best practices, and better support the implementation of SRHR at national level. Therefore, the Barometer partners call for a structured dialogue involving all relevant stakeholders at EU and national levels. Additionally, we urge the EU to make a greater investment in SRHR research and data collection.