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European Central Asia

Resources

Latest resources from across the Federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

Youth Voices, Youth Choices research report front cover

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, North Macedonia, Kosovo

Resource

Youth access to SRH information, education and care in the Balkans in COVID times

NEW: Our regional policy recommendations call on decision-makers to uphold young people's sexual and reproductive health and rights as we build back post-COVID.
Sexuality Education and Sustainable Development: Opportunities for EU Development Cooperation
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Sexuality Education and Sustainable Development: Opportunities for EU Development Cooperation

Sexual and reproductive rights are human rights. Education empowers young people and enables them to make their own choices. Comprehensive Sexuality education (CSE) allows young people to make critical choices about their health and future.It seeks to equip young people with the knowledge, life skills, attitudes and positive values they need to understand and enjoy their sexuality – physically and emotionally. This briefing paper presents the ways in which CSE is a key enabler for both social and economic sustainable development.

Sexuality Education and Sustainable Development: Opportunities for EU Development Cooperation
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Sexuality Education and Sustainable Development: Opportunities for EU Development Cooperation

Sexual and reproductive rights are human rights. Education empowers young people and enables them to make their own choices. Comprehensive Sexuality education (CSE) allows young people to make critical choices about their health and future.It seeks to equip young people with the knowledge, life skills, attitudes and positive values they need to understand and enjoy their sexuality – physically and emotionally. This briefing paper presents the ways in which CSE is a key enabler for both social and economic sustainable development.

IPPF EN Annual Report 2015
Resource

| 15 July 2016

Annual Report 2015

In 2015, IPPF EN made huge inroads across Europe and Central Asia. From providing life-saving sexual and reproductive health services to refugees in Macedonia to investing in communities to change young people’s lives in Romania, our Member Associations worked passionately to implement ambitious commitments in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights. Ensuring that governments deliver on sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality is central to our members’ work. Last year, our members helped to bring about key policy changes to ensure greater equality and tackle discrimination. For example, In Albania, the Labour law now prohibits discrimination based on gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy, or HIV status. The rights of young people are at the heart of our work. In Bulgaria a new law introduced health and sexuality education in schools for the first time, and in France, free contraception can now be provided anonymously to under-18s by a pharmacist.  IPPF EN will continue to challenge gender stereotypes and patriarchal social norms to help ensure that young people are able to reach their full potential.  To find out more about the work we did last year, click above!

IPPF EN Annual Report 2015
Resource

| 15 July 2016

Annual Report 2015

In 2015, IPPF EN made huge inroads across Europe and Central Asia. From providing life-saving sexual and reproductive health services to refugees in Macedonia to investing in communities to change young people’s lives in Romania, our Member Associations worked passionately to implement ambitious commitments in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights. Ensuring that governments deliver on sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality is central to our members’ work. Last year, our members helped to bring about key policy changes to ensure greater equality and tackle discrimination. For example, In Albania, the Labour law now prohibits discrimination based on gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy, or HIV status. The rights of young people are at the heart of our work. In Bulgaria a new law introduced health and sexuality education in schools for the first time, and in France, free contraception can now be provided anonymously to under-18s by a pharmacist.  IPPF EN will continue to challenge gender stereotypes and patriarchal social norms to help ensure that young people are able to reach their full potential.  To find out more about the work we did last year, click above!

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_9.jpg
Resource

| 07 July 2016

Uluk's story

Uluk's story is about young people,  myths and sexuality education in Karakol, Kyrgyzstan.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_9.jpg
Resource

| 07 July 2016

Uluk's story

Uluk's story is about young people,  myths and sexuality education in Karakol, Kyrgyzstan.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_19.jpg
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_19.jpg
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

People with learning disabilities deserve love and happiness
Resource

| 05 June 2016

Marian and Nicoleta

Meet Marian and Nicoleta. Their unique love story highlights the importance of ensuring that everyone, everywhere has the love and happiness they deserve.

People with learning disabilities deserve love and happiness
Resource

| 05 June 2016

Marian and Nicoleta

Meet Marian and Nicoleta. Their unique love story highlights the importance of ensuring that everyone, everywhere has the love and happiness they deserve.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapist Romania
Resource

| 13 May 2016

Eugenia's Story

Meet Eugenia Behar, a clinical psychologist working with young people with learning difficulties in Romania, a country where there is still no obligatory sexuality education across all schools, particularly for those with learning difficulties.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapist Romania
Resource

| 13 May 2016

Eugenia's Story

Meet Eugenia Behar, a clinical psychologist working with young people with learning difficulties in Romania, a country where there is still no obligatory sexuality education across all schools, particularly for those with learning difficulties.

Sexuality Education and Sustainable Development: Opportunities for EU Development Cooperation
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Sexuality Education and Sustainable Development: Opportunities for EU Development Cooperation

Sexual and reproductive rights are human rights. Education empowers young people and enables them to make their own choices. Comprehensive Sexuality education (CSE) allows young people to make critical choices about their health and future.It seeks to equip young people with the knowledge, life skills, attitudes and positive values they need to understand and enjoy their sexuality – physically and emotionally. This briefing paper presents the ways in which CSE is a key enabler for both social and economic sustainable development.

Sexuality Education and Sustainable Development: Opportunities for EU Development Cooperation
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Sexuality Education and Sustainable Development: Opportunities for EU Development Cooperation

Sexual and reproductive rights are human rights. Education empowers young people and enables them to make their own choices. Comprehensive Sexuality education (CSE) allows young people to make critical choices about their health and future.It seeks to equip young people with the knowledge, life skills, attitudes and positive values they need to understand and enjoy their sexuality – physically and emotionally. This briefing paper presents the ways in which CSE is a key enabler for both social and economic sustainable development.

IPPF EN Annual Report 2015
Resource

| 15 July 2016

Annual Report 2015

In 2015, IPPF EN made huge inroads across Europe and Central Asia. From providing life-saving sexual and reproductive health services to refugees in Macedonia to investing in communities to change young people’s lives in Romania, our Member Associations worked passionately to implement ambitious commitments in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights. Ensuring that governments deliver on sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality is central to our members’ work. Last year, our members helped to bring about key policy changes to ensure greater equality and tackle discrimination. For example, In Albania, the Labour law now prohibits discrimination based on gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy, or HIV status. The rights of young people are at the heart of our work. In Bulgaria a new law introduced health and sexuality education in schools for the first time, and in France, free contraception can now be provided anonymously to under-18s by a pharmacist.  IPPF EN will continue to challenge gender stereotypes and patriarchal social norms to help ensure that young people are able to reach their full potential.  To find out more about the work we did last year, click above!

IPPF EN Annual Report 2015
Resource

| 15 July 2016

Annual Report 2015

In 2015, IPPF EN made huge inroads across Europe and Central Asia. From providing life-saving sexual and reproductive health services to refugees in Macedonia to investing in communities to change young people’s lives in Romania, our Member Associations worked passionately to implement ambitious commitments in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights. Ensuring that governments deliver on sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality is central to our members’ work. Last year, our members helped to bring about key policy changes to ensure greater equality and tackle discrimination. For example, In Albania, the Labour law now prohibits discrimination based on gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy, or HIV status. The rights of young people are at the heart of our work. In Bulgaria a new law introduced health and sexuality education in schools for the first time, and in France, free contraception can now be provided anonymously to under-18s by a pharmacist.  IPPF EN will continue to challenge gender stereotypes and patriarchal social norms to help ensure that young people are able to reach their full potential.  To find out more about the work we did last year, click above!

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_9.jpg
Resource

| 07 July 2016

Uluk's story

Uluk's story is about young people,  myths and sexuality education in Karakol, Kyrgyzstan.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_9.jpg
Resource

| 07 July 2016

Uluk's story

Uluk's story is about young people,  myths and sexuality education in Karakol, Kyrgyzstan.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_19.jpg
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

aaron-burden-xG8IQMqMITM-unsplash_19.jpg
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

People with learning disabilities deserve love and happiness
Resource

| 05 June 2016

Marian and Nicoleta

Meet Marian and Nicoleta. Their unique love story highlights the importance of ensuring that everyone, everywhere has the love and happiness they deserve.

People with learning disabilities deserve love and happiness
Resource

| 05 June 2016

Marian and Nicoleta

Meet Marian and Nicoleta. Their unique love story highlights the importance of ensuring that everyone, everywhere has the love and happiness they deserve.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapist Romania
Resource

| 13 May 2016

Eugenia's Story

Meet Eugenia Behar, a clinical psychologist working with young people with learning difficulties in Romania, a country where there is still no obligatory sexuality education across all schools, particularly for those with learning difficulties.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapist Romania
Resource

| 13 May 2016

Eugenia's Story

Meet Eugenia Behar, a clinical psychologist working with young people with learning difficulties in Romania, a country where there is still no obligatory sexuality education across all schools, particularly for those with learning difficulties.