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European Central Asia

Resources

Latest resources from across the Federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

Youth Voices, Youth Choices research report front cover

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, North Macedonia, Kosovo

Resource

Young people’s access to SRH information, education and care in the Western Balkans in Covid times

These reports present the findings of a study on young people's SRHR, focusing on the impacts of COVID-19.
under construction
Resource

| 22 September 2022

Combatting harmful gender norms through innovative education

Rigid gender norms or stereotypes limit people’s ability to pursue their professional careers and make choices about their lives. Gender norms not only limit people’s freedom and choices, but they end up condoning gender-based violence and perpetuating inequalities rooted in unbalanced power dynamics. As a result, people are coerced by collective expectations into taking up gender roles that stop them from pursuing the careers and relationships they want, or even being themselves. For example, young men are often expected to suppress their emotions so that they can conform to damaging understandings of strength and masculinity. This leaves men illequipped to express or navigate through their emotions, which can later on cause issues for their mental health. Equally, young women are often expected to be polite and accommodating to others - even in situations where they are made to feel uncomfortable. Conforming to this expectation can make it more difficult for women to assert themselves and can lead to their enduring discrimination or abuse without possessing the skills or confidence to address it. But relationship and sexuality education can play a crucial role in dismantling and challenging harmful gender norms, thus preventing gender-based violence and giving young people the skills needed to lead more equal and safe lives. Furthermore, training of adults and educators is key to raising their awareness around existing gender stereotypes that they may inadvertently perpetuate. Civil society organisations in Serbia, Estonia, Romania and Latvia came together under the Youth SpectActors project to do just that. The main purpose of the project was to educate and empower young people between 12-25 years of age to question gender norms, attitudes and stereotypes that contribute or could lead to gender-based-violence (GBV) through organising theatrical plays that deal with typical situations where gender identity and expression occur. Read about the results of our project on people's lives in the below factsheet.

under construction
Resource

| 29 September 2022

Combatting harmful gender norms through innovative education

Rigid gender norms or stereotypes limit people’s ability to pursue their professional careers and make choices about their lives. Gender norms not only limit people’s freedom and choices, but they end up condoning gender-based violence and perpetuating inequalities rooted in unbalanced power dynamics. As a result, people are coerced by collective expectations into taking up gender roles that stop them from pursuing the careers and relationships they want, or even being themselves. For example, young men are often expected to suppress their emotions so that they can conform to damaging understandings of strength and masculinity. This leaves men illequipped to express or navigate through their emotions, which can later on cause issues for their mental health. Equally, young women are often expected to be polite and accommodating to others - even in situations where they are made to feel uncomfortable. Conforming to this expectation can make it more difficult for women to assert themselves and can lead to their enduring discrimination or abuse without possessing the skills or confidence to address it. But relationship and sexuality education can play a crucial role in dismantling and challenging harmful gender norms, thus preventing gender-based violence and giving young people the skills needed to lead more equal and safe lives. Furthermore, training of adults and educators is key to raising their awareness around existing gender stereotypes that they may inadvertently perpetuate. Civil society organisations in Serbia, Estonia, Romania and Latvia came together under the Youth SpectActors project to do just that. The main purpose of the project was to educate and empower young people between 12-25 years of age to question gender norms, attitudes and stereotypes that contribute or could lead to gender-based-violence (GBV) through organising theatrical plays that deal with typical situations where gender identity and expression occur. Read about the results of our project on people's lives in the below factsheet.

abortion is health care
Resource

| 06 July 2022

2021 IPPF EN Annual Performance Report

The pandemic remained an ever-present backdrop to our work in 2021, as online tools brought new opportunities for learning, innovation and expanding our reach, but with valuable face-to-face activities still limited and shifting restrictions forcing us to make constant adjustments. Like our resilient Member Associations (MAs) and partners, we adapted and continued to deliver on our programmes and commitments. By the end of the year, a “new normal” of hybrid working and increased stability began to come into view. Another constant was interference by opposition forces, persistently seeking to reverse progress and undermine rights, freedoms and the rule of law. ENRO continued to push back, through our external engagement and through our support to social movements, MAs and partners building on our experience with winning narratives and blending expertise and skills from across our team to help strengthen, connect and amplify the voice of national activists and boost regional solidarity and political support for their causes.   It was an exciting year in terms of securing restricted funding to support our work on our regional priorities. We kicked off in January with a brand new project funded by MSD for Mothers, building on young people’s experiences of the pandemic to ensure youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care in the Balkans. And in November we won a 4-year framework partnership agreement with the European Commission for core support to ENRO’s championing of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and gender equality. Also in November, the Gates Foundation invited the ENRO-led Countdown 2030 Europe Consortium to submit a new and expanded 4-year proposal to continue holding European decision-makers accountable for their international development commitments. At the global level, as IPPF continued to change and adapt to meet the challenges of our age, ENRO made many active contributions to consolidating a united secretariat, collaborating with colleagues from around the globe in a wide range of areas, both functional and cross-cutting, and helping the sharing of technical knowledge, learning and best practices. We also invested in the development of the new global strategy 2023-28, convening our MAs and young people to input their expertise, facilitating roundtables and providing our own insights at each step.  

abortion is health care
Resource

| 06 July 2022

2021 IPPF EN Annual Performance Report

The pandemic remained an ever-present backdrop to our work in 2021, as online tools brought new opportunities for learning, innovation and expanding our reach, but with valuable face-to-face activities still limited and shifting restrictions forcing us to make constant adjustments. Like our resilient Member Associations (MAs) and partners, we adapted and continued to deliver on our programmes and commitments. By the end of the year, a “new normal” of hybrid working and increased stability began to come into view. Another constant was interference by opposition forces, persistently seeking to reverse progress and undermine rights, freedoms and the rule of law. ENRO continued to push back, through our external engagement and through our support to social movements, MAs and partners building on our experience with winning narratives and blending expertise and skills from across our team to help strengthen, connect and amplify the voice of national activists and boost regional solidarity and political support for their causes.   It was an exciting year in terms of securing restricted funding to support our work on our regional priorities. We kicked off in January with a brand new project funded by MSD for Mothers, building on young people’s experiences of the pandemic to ensure youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care in the Balkans. And in November we won a 4-year framework partnership agreement with the European Commission for core support to ENRO’s championing of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and gender equality. Also in November, the Gates Foundation invited the ENRO-led Countdown 2030 Europe Consortium to submit a new and expanded 4-year proposal to continue holding European decision-makers accountable for their international development commitments. At the global level, as IPPF continued to change and adapt to meet the challenges of our age, ENRO made many active contributions to consolidating a united secretariat, collaborating with colleagues from around the globe in a wide range of areas, both functional and cross-cutting, and helping the sharing of technical knowledge, learning and best practices. We also invested in the development of the new global strategy 2023-28, convening our MAs and young people to input their expertise, facilitating roundtables and providing our own insights at each step.  

outcome 1
Resource

| 20 June 2022

2021 IPPF Annual Performance Report

IPPF has always done the utmost to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights for all. In 2021, IPPF Member Associations (MAs) continued to demonstrate their resilience and adaptability to carry on serving people in spite of the severe disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.  A total of 231.4 million services were delivered, a six per cent increase on 2020. Despite comprising fewer MAs, IPPF recovered more than half the decrease caused the previous year by clinic closures and other restrictions. Couple years of protection (CYP) increased by eight percent to reach 29 million – higher than in any year prior to the pandemic.

outcome 1
Resource

| 20 June 2022

2021 IPPF Annual Performance Report

IPPF has always done the utmost to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights for all. In 2021, IPPF Member Associations (MAs) continued to demonstrate their resilience and adaptability to carry on serving people in spite of the severe disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.  A total of 231.4 million services were delivered, a six per cent increase on 2020. Despite comprising fewer MAs, IPPF recovered more than half the decrease caused the previous year by clinic closures and other restrictions. Couple years of protection (CYP) increased by eight percent to reach 29 million – higher than in any year prior to the pandemic.

MBMR
Resource

| 20 June 2022

Bringing people together for reproductive freedom

IPPF members are working hand-in-hand with networks of actors from within and around diverse Roma communities in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia. The common goal: to improve access to life-changing sexual and reproductive healthcare for girls, women and young people, and tackle some of the deep rooted obstacles that prevent people - especially women and youth - from living safer and healthier lives. We are proud to share highlights of our work, recommendations to decision-makers and impact story in the below brochure.

MBMR
Resource

| 20 June 2022

Bringing people together for reproductive freedom

IPPF members are working hand-in-hand with networks of actors from within and around diverse Roma communities in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia. The common goal: to improve access to life-changing sexual and reproductive healthcare for girls, women and young people, and tackle some of the deep rooted obstacles that prevent people - especially women and youth - from living safer and healthier lives. We are proud to share highlights of our work, recommendations to decision-makers and impact story in the below brochure.

yca.gif
Resource

| 06 April 2022

A Youth-Centred Approach

IPPF European Network has developed a YCA toolkit with the aim of improving the confidence and capacity of young people and adults to implement, upgrade and expand youth participation in our members. But the principles of the approach could be applied in other organizations outside IPPF who want to involve more youth voices in their work. The toolkit was developed during YCA coaching initiatives with IPPF members. As a result: Members redesigned youth policies, strategies and practices Youth groups were revived, and the number of young volunteers increased Youth became more involved in decision-making within our member associations Youth-friendly working spaces were set up Working relations between youth and members were strengthened Best practices were exchanged between members

yca.gif
Resource

| 06 April 2022

A Youth-Centred Approach

IPPF European Network has developed a YCA toolkit with the aim of improving the confidence and capacity of young people and adults to implement, upgrade and expand youth participation in our members. But the principles of the approach could be applied in other organizations outside IPPF who want to involve more youth voices in their work. The toolkit was developed during YCA coaching initiatives with IPPF members. As a result: Members redesigned youth policies, strategies and practices Youth groups were revived, and the number of young volunteers increased Youth became more involved in decision-making within our member associations Youth-friendly working spaces were set up Working relations between youth and members were strengthened Best practices were exchanged between members

img-slide-6-valya-resources-lg.png
Resource

| 01 April 2022

Working with the Roma community and local actors for reproductive freedom

In the Balkans, IPPF members are working hand-in-hand with diverse networks of actors from within and around Roma communities. This work was shaped as the My Body, My Rights project. Our common goal is to strengthen girls’ lifelong reproductive freedom and tackle some of the deep-rooted, systemic obstacles that prevent people - especially women and youth - from living safer and healthier lives. How? By increasing access to care, creating supporting contexts for choice and advocating for investment. Our work is community-driven and based on fostering local partnerships. At the heart of this collective action are Roma volunteers, girls and boys, health mediators and local NGOs, leading grassroots change and advocating for their own unique communities. Doctors, community nurses and teachers are working with them to help deliver lasting impact. And some decision-makers are stepping up and beginning to make much-needed investments in more equitable access to reproductive healthcare. We are proud to share highlights of our work, recommendations to decision-makers and resources for further reading. Explore our new microsite!   

img-slide-6-valya-resources-lg.png
Resource

| 08 April 2022

Working with the Roma community and local actors for reproductive freedom

In the Balkans, IPPF members are working hand-in-hand with diverse networks of actors from within and around Roma communities. This work was shaped as the My Body, My Rights project. Our common goal is to strengthen girls’ lifelong reproductive freedom and tackle some of the deep-rooted, systemic obstacles that prevent people - especially women and youth - from living safer and healthier lives. How? By increasing access to care, creating supporting contexts for choice and advocating for investment. Our work is community-driven and based on fostering local partnerships. At the heart of this collective action are Roma volunteers, girls and boys, health mediators and local NGOs, leading grassroots change and advocating for their own unique communities. Doctors, community nurses and teachers are working with them to help deliver lasting impact. And some decision-makers are stepping up and beginning to make much-needed investments in more equitable access to reproductive healthcare. We are proud to share highlights of our work, recommendations to decision-makers and resources for further reading. Explore our new microsite!   

under construction
Resource

| 22 September 2022

Combatting harmful gender norms through innovative education

Rigid gender norms or stereotypes limit people’s ability to pursue their professional careers and make choices about their lives. Gender norms not only limit people’s freedom and choices, but they end up condoning gender-based violence and perpetuating inequalities rooted in unbalanced power dynamics. As a result, people are coerced by collective expectations into taking up gender roles that stop them from pursuing the careers and relationships they want, or even being themselves. For example, young men are often expected to suppress their emotions so that they can conform to damaging understandings of strength and masculinity. This leaves men illequipped to express or navigate through their emotions, which can later on cause issues for their mental health. Equally, young women are often expected to be polite and accommodating to others - even in situations where they are made to feel uncomfortable. Conforming to this expectation can make it more difficult for women to assert themselves and can lead to their enduring discrimination or abuse without possessing the skills or confidence to address it. But relationship and sexuality education can play a crucial role in dismantling and challenging harmful gender norms, thus preventing gender-based violence and giving young people the skills needed to lead more equal and safe lives. Furthermore, training of adults and educators is key to raising their awareness around existing gender stereotypes that they may inadvertently perpetuate. Civil society organisations in Serbia, Estonia, Romania and Latvia came together under the Youth SpectActors project to do just that. The main purpose of the project was to educate and empower young people between 12-25 years of age to question gender norms, attitudes and stereotypes that contribute or could lead to gender-based-violence (GBV) through organising theatrical plays that deal with typical situations where gender identity and expression occur. Read about the results of our project on people's lives in the below factsheet.

under construction
Resource

| 29 September 2022

Combatting harmful gender norms through innovative education

Rigid gender norms or stereotypes limit people’s ability to pursue their professional careers and make choices about their lives. Gender norms not only limit people’s freedom and choices, but they end up condoning gender-based violence and perpetuating inequalities rooted in unbalanced power dynamics. As a result, people are coerced by collective expectations into taking up gender roles that stop them from pursuing the careers and relationships they want, or even being themselves. For example, young men are often expected to suppress their emotions so that they can conform to damaging understandings of strength and masculinity. This leaves men illequipped to express or navigate through their emotions, which can later on cause issues for their mental health. Equally, young women are often expected to be polite and accommodating to others - even in situations where they are made to feel uncomfortable. Conforming to this expectation can make it more difficult for women to assert themselves and can lead to their enduring discrimination or abuse without possessing the skills or confidence to address it. But relationship and sexuality education can play a crucial role in dismantling and challenging harmful gender norms, thus preventing gender-based violence and giving young people the skills needed to lead more equal and safe lives. Furthermore, training of adults and educators is key to raising their awareness around existing gender stereotypes that they may inadvertently perpetuate. Civil society organisations in Serbia, Estonia, Romania and Latvia came together under the Youth SpectActors project to do just that. The main purpose of the project was to educate and empower young people between 12-25 years of age to question gender norms, attitudes and stereotypes that contribute or could lead to gender-based-violence (GBV) through organising theatrical plays that deal with typical situations where gender identity and expression occur. Read about the results of our project on people's lives in the below factsheet.

abortion is health care
Resource

| 06 July 2022

2021 IPPF EN Annual Performance Report

The pandemic remained an ever-present backdrop to our work in 2021, as online tools brought new opportunities for learning, innovation and expanding our reach, but with valuable face-to-face activities still limited and shifting restrictions forcing us to make constant adjustments. Like our resilient Member Associations (MAs) and partners, we adapted and continued to deliver on our programmes and commitments. By the end of the year, a “new normal” of hybrid working and increased stability began to come into view. Another constant was interference by opposition forces, persistently seeking to reverse progress and undermine rights, freedoms and the rule of law. ENRO continued to push back, through our external engagement and through our support to social movements, MAs and partners building on our experience with winning narratives and blending expertise and skills from across our team to help strengthen, connect and amplify the voice of national activists and boost regional solidarity and political support for their causes.   It was an exciting year in terms of securing restricted funding to support our work on our regional priorities. We kicked off in January with a brand new project funded by MSD for Mothers, building on young people’s experiences of the pandemic to ensure youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care in the Balkans. And in November we won a 4-year framework partnership agreement with the European Commission for core support to ENRO’s championing of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and gender equality. Also in November, the Gates Foundation invited the ENRO-led Countdown 2030 Europe Consortium to submit a new and expanded 4-year proposal to continue holding European decision-makers accountable for their international development commitments. At the global level, as IPPF continued to change and adapt to meet the challenges of our age, ENRO made many active contributions to consolidating a united secretariat, collaborating with colleagues from around the globe in a wide range of areas, both functional and cross-cutting, and helping the sharing of technical knowledge, learning and best practices. We also invested in the development of the new global strategy 2023-28, convening our MAs and young people to input their expertise, facilitating roundtables and providing our own insights at each step.  

abortion is health care
Resource

| 06 July 2022

2021 IPPF EN Annual Performance Report

The pandemic remained an ever-present backdrop to our work in 2021, as online tools brought new opportunities for learning, innovation and expanding our reach, but with valuable face-to-face activities still limited and shifting restrictions forcing us to make constant adjustments. Like our resilient Member Associations (MAs) and partners, we adapted and continued to deliver on our programmes and commitments. By the end of the year, a “new normal” of hybrid working and increased stability began to come into view. Another constant was interference by opposition forces, persistently seeking to reverse progress and undermine rights, freedoms and the rule of law. ENRO continued to push back, through our external engagement and through our support to social movements, MAs and partners building on our experience with winning narratives and blending expertise and skills from across our team to help strengthen, connect and amplify the voice of national activists and boost regional solidarity and political support for their causes.   It was an exciting year in terms of securing restricted funding to support our work on our regional priorities. We kicked off in January with a brand new project funded by MSD for Mothers, building on young people’s experiences of the pandemic to ensure youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care in the Balkans. And in November we won a 4-year framework partnership agreement with the European Commission for core support to ENRO’s championing of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and gender equality. Also in November, the Gates Foundation invited the ENRO-led Countdown 2030 Europe Consortium to submit a new and expanded 4-year proposal to continue holding European decision-makers accountable for their international development commitments. At the global level, as IPPF continued to change and adapt to meet the challenges of our age, ENRO made many active contributions to consolidating a united secretariat, collaborating with colleagues from around the globe in a wide range of areas, both functional and cross-cutting, and helping the sharing of technical knowledge, learning and best practices. We also invested in the development of the new global strategy 2023-28, convening our MAs and young people to input their expertise, facilitating roundtables and providing our own insights at each step.  

outcome 1
Resource

| 20 June 2022

2021 IPPF Annual Performance Report

IPPF has always done the utmost to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights for all. In 2021, IPPF Member Associations (MAs) continued to demonstrate their resilience and adaptability to carry on serving people in spite of the severe disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.  A total of 231.4 million services were delivered, a six per cent increase on 2020. Despite comprising fewer MAs, IPPF recovered more than half the decrease caused the previous year by clinic closures and other restrictions. Couple years of protection (CYP) increased by eight percent to reach 29 million – higher than in any year prior to the pandemic.

outcome 1
Resource

| 20 June 2022

2021 IPPF Annual Performance Report

IPPF has always done the utmost to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights for all. In 2021, IPPF Member Associations (MAs) continued to demonstrate their resilience and adaptability to carry on serving people in spite of the severe disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.  A total of 231.4 million services were delivered, a six per cent increase on 2020. Despite comprising fewer MAs, IPPF recovered more than half the decrease caused the previous year by clinic closures and other restrictions. Couple years of protection (CYP) increased by eight percent to reach 29 million – higher than in any year prior to the pandemic.

MBMR
Resource

| 20 June 2022

Bringing people together for reproductive freedom

IPPF members are working hand-in-hand with networks of actors from within and around diverse Roma communities in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia. The common goal: to improve access to life-changing sexual and reproductive healthcare for girls, women and young people, and tackle some of the deep rooted obstacles that prevent people - especially women and youth - from living safer and healthier lives. We are proud to share highlights of our work, recommendations to decision-makers and impact story in the below brochure.

MBMR
Resource

| 20 June 2022

Bringing people together for reproductive freedom

IPPF members are working hand-in-hand with networks of actors from within and around diverse Roma communities in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia. The common goal: to improve access to life-changing sexual and reproductive healthcare for girls, women and young people, and tackle some of the deep rooted obstacles that prevent people - especially women and youth - from living safer and healthier lives. We are proud to share highlights of our work, recommendations to decision-makers and impact story in the below brochure.

yca.gif
Resource

| 06 April 2022

A Youth-Centred Approach

IPPF European Network has developed a YCA toolkit with the aim of improving the confidence and capacity of young people and adults to implement, upgrade and expand youth participation in our members. But the principles of the approach could be applied in other organizations outside IPPF who want to involve more youth voices in their work. The toolkit was developed during YCA coaching initiatives with IPPF members. As a result: Members redesigned youth policies, strategies and practices Youth groups were revived, and the number of young volunteers increased Youth became more involved in decision-making within our member associations Youth-friendly working spaces were set up Working relations between youth and members were strengthened Best practices were exchanged between members

yca.gif
Resource

| 06 April 2022

A Youth-Centred Approach

IPPF European Network has developed a YCA toolkit with the aim of improving the confidence and capacity of young people and adults to implement, upgrade and expand youth participation in our members. But the principles of the approach could be applied in other organizations outside IPPF who want to involve more youth voices in their work. The toolkit was developed during YCA coaching initiatives with IPPF members. As a result: Members redesigned youth policies, strategies and practices Youth groups were revived, and the number of young volunteers increased Youth became more involved in decision-making within our member associations Youth-friendly working spaces were set up Working relations between youth and members were strengthened Best practices were exchanged between members

img-slide-6-valya-resources-lg.png
Resource

| 01 April 2022

Working with the Roma community and local actors for reproductive freedom

In the Balkans, IPPF members are working hand-in-hand with diverse networks of actors from within and around Roma communities. This work was shaped as the My Body, My Rights project. Our common goal is to strengthen girls’ lifelong reproductive freedom and tackle some of the deep-rooted, systemic obstacles that prevent people - especially women and youth - from living safer and healthier lives. How? By increasing access to care, creating supporting contexts for choice and advocating for investment. Our work is community-driven and based on fostering local partnerships. At the heart of this collective action are Roma volunteers, girls and boys, health mediators and local NGOs, leading grassroots change and advocating for their own unique communities. Doctors, community nurses and teachers are working with them to help deliver lasting impact. And some decision-makers are stepping up and beginning to make much-needed investments in more equitable access to reproductive healthcare. We are proud to share highlights of our work, recommendations to decision-makers and resources for further reading. Explore our new microsite!   

img-slide-6-valya-resources-lg.png
Resource

| 08 April 2022

Working with the Roma community and local actors for reproductive freedom

In the Balkans, IPPF members are working hand-in-hand with diverse networks of actors from within and around Roma communities. This work was shaped as the My Body, My Rights project. Our common goal is to strengthen girls’ lifelong reproductive freedom and tackle some of the deep-rooted, systemic obstacles that prevent people - especially women and youth - from living safer and healthier lives. How? By increasing access to care, creating supporting contexts for choice and advocating for investment. Our work is community-driven and based on fostering local partnerships. At the heart of this collective action are Roma volunteers, girls and boys, health mediators and local NGOs, leading grassroots change and advocating for their own unique communities. Doctors, community nurses and teachers are working with them to help deliver lasting impact. And some decision-makers are stepping up and beginning to make much-needed investments in more equitable access to reproductive healthcare. We are proud to share highlights of our work, recommendations to decision-makers and resources for further reading. Explore our new microsite!