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European Central Asia

Resources

Latest resources from across the Federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

Image of gynaecological medical setting
Resource

Gynaecological and Obstetric Violence - a form of gender-based violence

22 November 2022

Our research and policy paper outlines the systemic and widespread nature of OBGYN violence across the European Union, and makes policy recommendations on how to tackle this form of GBV.
Nadia defend the defenders
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Nadia: “There Is Hope For A Better Future For Women In Poland.”

Human rights defenders in Poland have been working tirelessly for years to fight the dismantling of the rule of law and human rights. They continue to do so in the face of increasing oppression, orchestrated and encouraged by the government – including intimidation, detention, and criminal charges. Many have been subjected to threats and attacks, both from state actors and far-right groups.  Nadia, 21 years old student from Poland, is the target of visceral personal attacks online, unrelenting violent behaviour, sexism & discrimination. All because she stands for reproductive freedom & equal pay. But Nadia believes activism can change the world.  More about Nadia and on how to donate to women human rights defenders in Poland.

Nadia defend the defenders
Resource

| 10 October 2021

Nadia: “There Is Hope For A Better Future For Women In Poland.”

Human rights defenders in Poland have been working tirelessly for years to fight the dismantling of the rule of law and human rights. They continue to do so in the face of increasing oppression, orchestrated and encouraged by the government – including intimidation, detention, and criminal charges. Many have been subjected to threats and attacks, both from state actors and far-right groups.  Nadia, 21 years old student from Poland, is the target of visceral personal attacks online, unrelenting violent behaviour, sexism & discrimination. All because she stands for reproductive freedom & equal pay. But Nadia believes activism can change the world.  More about Nadia and on how to donate to women human rights defenders in Poland.

Alert for Poland
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Defend the Defenders in Poland - donate

Human rights defenders in Poland have been working tirelessly for years to fight the dismantling of the rule of law and human rights. They continue to do so in the face of increasing oppression, orchestrated and encouraged by the government – including intimidation, detention, and criminal charges. Many have been subjected to threats and attacks, both from state actors and far-right groups. The Polish Women’s Strike and other organisations have received bomb threats and now need to have security at their buildings. Activists are also being targeted with smear campaigns in state-owned media. The actions of the police have been insufficient to ensure their protection. Donate to support legal assistance in court cases and psychological assistance for human rights defenders: https://defendthedefenders.eu/donate/

Alert for Poland
Resource

| 19 October 2021

Defend the Defenders in Poland - donate

Human rights defenders in Poland have been working tirelessly for years to fight the dismantling of the rule of law and human rights. They continue to do so in the face of increasing oppression, orchestrated and encouraged by the government – including intimidation, detention, and criminal charges. Many have been subjected to threats and attacks, both from state actors and far-right groups. The Polish Women’s Strike and other organisations have received bomb threats and now need to have security at their buildings. Activists are also being targeted with smear campaigns in state-owned media. The actions of the police have been insufficient to ensure their protection. Donate to support legal assistance in court cases and psychological assistance for human rights defenders: https://defendthedefenders.eu/donate/

Women_s Voices Series _41226_Panos_IPPF (1)_0.jpg
Resource

| 14 January 2022

European abortion policies atlas

The joint EPF-IPPF EN “European Abortion Policies Atlas” scores 52 European countries and territories on legal frameworks to access safe abortion care and clearly shows that Europe is not as progressive as it might seem.  This first in-depth analysis of abortion policies across Europe finds that legislation on abortion care throughout the region is a diverse legislative and administrative patchwork - the consequence being that women’s experience of abortion care largely depends upon their postcode: 31 countries don’t include abortion in the national health system’s financial coverage - this penalises all women and girls, but specifically the vulnerable (e.g. low income, living in rural areas, Roma, sex workers and undocumented migrants). 19 countries, including several known for progressive stances, force women to endure medically unnecessary requirements before accessing abortion care (compulsory and sometimes biased counselling, forced waiting periods). A safe, voluntary abortion should not be treated as a crime. And yet, 16 countries in Europe regulate abortion care primarily through their criminal and/or penal code. 26 countries allow health workers to deny care on the basis of their personal beliefs or convenience, thus potentially placing women in serious danger.  18 European countries fail to provide people with clear and accurate information about abortion care. Governments have a responsibility to safeguard the right of women and girls to lead free and safe reproductive lives without discrimination and coercion. We call on governments to:  Modernise abortion laws (decriminalise abortion laws, extend time limits) Ensure that abortion care is covered by the national health system Remove unnecessary obstacles in accessing abortion care following WHO recommendations Prohibit health providers from legally opting out of any part of the full spectrum of reproductive health care Provide accurate information about abortion care.

Women_s Voices Series _41226_Panos_IPPF (1)_0.jpg
Resource

| 24 September 2021

European abortion policies atlas

The joint EPF-IPPF EN “European Abortion Policies Atlas” scores 52 European countries and territories on legal frameworks to access safe abortion care and clearly shows that Europe is not as progressive as it might seem.  This first in-depth analysis of abortion policies across Europe finds that legislation on abortion care throughout the region is a diverse legislative and administrative patchwork - the consequence being that women’s experience of abortion care largely depends upon their postcode: 31 countries don’t include abortion in the national health system’s financial coverage - this penalises all women and girls, but specifically the vulnerable (e.g. low income, living in rural areas, Roma, sex workers and undocumented migrants). 19 countries, including several known for progressive stances, force women to endure medically unnecessary requirements before accessing abortion care (compulsory and sometimes biased counselling, forced waiting periods). A safe, voluntary abortion should not be treated as a crime. And yet, 16 countries in Europe regulate abortion care primarily through their criminal and/or penal code. 26 countries allow health workers to deny care on the basis of their personal beliefs or convenience, thus potentially placing women in serious danger.  18 European countries fail to provide people with clear and accurate information about abortion care. Governments have a responsibility to safeguard the right of women and girls to lead free and safe reproductive lives without discrimination and coercion. We call on governments to:  Modernise abortion laws (decriminalise abortion laws, extend time limits) Ensure that abortion care is covered by the national health system Remove unnecessary obstacles in accessing abortion care following WHO recommendations Prohibit health providers from legally opting out of any part of the full spectrum of reproductive health care Provide accurate information about abortion care.

Nadia defend the defenders
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Nadia: “There Is Hope For A Better Future For Women In Poland.”

Human rights defenders in Poland have been working tirelessly for years to fight the dismantling of the rule of law and human rights. They continue to do so in the face of increasing oppression, orchestrated and encouraged by the government – including intimidation, detention, and criminal charges. Many have been subjected to threats and attacks, both from state actors and far-right groups.  Nadia, 21 years old student from Poland, is the target of visceral personal attacks online, unrelenting violent behaviour, sexism & discrimination. All because she stands for reproductive freedom & equal pay. But Nadia believes activism can change the world.  More about Nadia and on how to donate to women human rights defenders in Poland.

Nadia defend the defenders
Resource

| 10 October 2021

Nadia: “There Is Hope For A Better Future For Women In Poland.”

Human rights defenders in Poland have been working tirelessly for years to fight the dismantling of the rule of law and human rights. They continue to do so in the face of increasing oppression, orchestrated and encouraged by the government – including intimidation, detention, and criminal charges. Many have been subjected to threats and attacks, both from state actors and far-right groups.  Nadia, 21 years old student from Poland, is the target of visceral personal attacks online, unrelenting violent behaviour, sexism & discrimination. All because she stands for reproductive freedom & equal pay. But Nadia believes activism can change the world.  More about Nadia and on how to donate to women human rights defenders in Poland.

Alert for Poland
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Defend the Defenders in Poland - donate

Human rights defenders in Poland have been working tirelessly for years to fight the dismantling of the rule of law and human rights. They continue to do so in the face of increasing oppression, orchestrated and encouraged by the government – including intimidation, detention, and criminal charges. Many have been subjected to threats and attacks, both from state actors and far-right groups. The Polish Women’s Strike and other organisations have received bomb threats and now need to have security at their buildings. Activists are also being targeted with smear campaigns in state-owned media. The actions of the police have been insufficient to ensure their protection. Donate to support legal assistance in court cases and psychological assistance for human rights defenders: https://defendthedefenders.eu/donate/

Alert for Poland
Resource

| 19 October 2021

Defend the Defenders in Poland - donate

Human rights defenders in Poland have been working tirelessly for years to fight the dismantling of the rule of law and human rights. They continue to do so in the face of increasing oppression, orchestrated and encouraged by the government – including intimidation, detention, and criminal charges. Many have been subjected to threats and attacks, both from state actors and far-right groups. The Polish Women’s Strike and other organisations have received bomb threats and now need to have security at their buildings. Activists are also being targeted with smear campaigns in state-owned media. The actions of the police have been insufficient to ensure their protection. Donate to support legal assistance in court cases and psychological assistance for human rights defenders: https://defendthedefenders.eu/donate/

Women_s Voices Series _41226_Panos_IPPF (1)_0.jpg
Resource

| 14 January 2022

European abortion policies atlas

The joint EPF-IPPF EN “European Abortion Policies Atlas” scores 52 European countries and territories on legal frameworks to access safe abortion care and clearly shows that Europe is not as progressive as it might seem.  This first in-depth analysis of abortion policies across Europe finds that legislation on abortion care throughout the region is a diverse legislative and administrative patchwork - the consequence being that women’s experience of abortion care largely depends upon their postcode: 31 countries don’t include abortion in the national health system’s financial coverage - this penalises all women and girls, but specifically the vulnerable (e.g. low income, living in rural areas, Roma, sex workers and undocumented migrants). 19 countries, including several known for progressive stances, force women to endure medically unnecessary requirements before accessing abortion care (compulsory and sometimes biased counselling, forced waiting periods). A safe, voluntary abortion should not be treated as a crime. And yet, 16 countries in Europe regulate abortion care primarily through their criminal and/or penal code. 26 countries allow health workers to deny care on the basis of their personal beliefs or convenience, thus potentially placing women in serious danger.  18 European countries fail to provide people with clear and accurate information about abortion care. Governments have a responsibility to safeguard the right of women and girls to lead free and safe reproductive lives without discrimination and coercion. We call on governments to:  Modernise abortion laws (decriminalise abortion laws, extend time limits) Ensure that abortion care is covered by the national health system Remove unnecessary obstacles in accessing abortion care following WHO recommendations Prohibit health providers from legally opting out of any part of the full spectrum of reproductive health care Provide accurate information about abortion care.

Women_s Voices Series _41226_Panos_IPPF (1)_0.jpg
Resource

| 24 September 2021

European abortion policies atlas

The joint EPF-IPPF EN “European Abortion Policies Atlas” scores 52 European countries and territories on legal frameworks to access safe abortion care and clearly shows that Europe is not as progressive as it might seem.  This first in-depth analysis of abortion policies across Europe finds that legislation on abortion care throughout the region is a diverse legislative and administrative patchwork - the consequence being that women’s experience of abortion care largely depends upon their postcode: 31 countries don’t include abortion in the national health system’s financial coverage - this penalises all women and girls, but specifically the vulnerable (e.g. low income, living in rural areas, Roma, sex workers and undocumented migrants). 19 countries, including several known for progressive stances, force women to endure medically unnecessary requirements before accessing abortion care (compulsory and sometimes biased counselling, forced waiting periods). A safe, voluntary abortion should not be treated as a crime. And yet, 16 countries in Europe regulate abortion care primarily through their criminal and/or penal code. 26 countries allow health workers to deny care on the basis of their personal beliefs or convenience, thus potentially placing women in serious danger.  18 European countries fail to provide people with clear and accurate information about abortion care. Governments have a responsibility to safeguard the right of women and girls to lead free and safe reproductive lives without discrimination and coercion. We call on governments to:  Modernise abortion laws (decriminalise abortion laws, extend time limits) Ensure that abortion care is covered by the national health system Remove unnecessary obstacles in accessing abortion care following WHO recommendations Prohibit health providers from legally opting out of any part of the full spectrum of reproductive health care Provide accurate information about abortion care.