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European Central Asia

Resources

Latest resources from across the Federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

Youth Voices, Youth Choices research report front cover

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, North Macedonia, Kosovo

Resource

Young people’s access to SRH information, education and care in the Western Balkans in Covid times

These reports present the findings of a study on young people's SRHR, focusing on the impacts of COVID-19.
EWAG
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Girls unite to shape the EU-Africa partnership

The European Week of Action for Girls (EWAG), that is annually organised to mark International Day of the Girl (11th October), gathers young advocates to advance girls’ rights and gender equality in the EU space. This year, it is providing a platform for girls to speak out about how the AU-EU Partnership can reflect their aspirations and unlock their potential. It is crucial that the strategy enables dialogue between both regions, allowing for mutual learning and joint and coordinated actions, especially on issues that affect girls and young women both in the EU and the AU - such as sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR), Education and Economic Empowerment and Political Participation. Over the summer of 2021 the EWAG young advocates connected on several occasions to define their recommendations to the EU in four key areas. Read more below and watch our video summarizing youth advocates' recommendations.

EWAG
Resource

| 05 October 2021

Girls unite to shape the EU-Africa partnership

The European Week of Action for Girls (EWAG), that is annually organised to mark International Day of the Girl (11th October), gathers young advocates to advance girls’ rights and gender equality in the EU space. This year, it is providing a platform for girls to speak out about how the AU-EU Partnership can reflect their aspirations and unlock their potential. It is crucial that the strategy enables dialogue between both regions, allowing for mutual learning and joint and coordinated actions, especially on issues that affect girls and young women both in the EU and the AU - such as sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR), Education and Economic Empowerment and Political Participation. Over the summer of 2021 the EWAG young advocates connected on several occasions to define their recommendations to the EU in four key areas. Read more below and watch our video summarizing youth advocates' recommendations.

women-in-community--with--bg (1).jpg
Resource

| 14 January 2022

My Body, My Rights - short film

When vulnerable communities, volunteers and professionals unite for reproductive freedom, they are a powerful force for change. Our short film features five stories that show how IPPF members in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia are supporting the lifelong reproductive health and safety of Roma girls, women and young people, working on the multiple fronts necessary to improve access and uptake of quality family planning and maternal health care. Learn more about the My Body, My Rights project here. 

women-in-community--with--bg (1).jpg
Resource

| 27 September 2021

My Body, My Rights - short film

When vulnerable communities, volunteers and professionals unite for reproductive freedom, they are a powerful force for change. Our short film features five stories that show how IPPF members in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia are supporting the lifelong reproductive health and safety of Roma girls, women and young people, working on the multiple fronts necessary to improve access and uptake of quality family planning and maternal health care. Learn more about the My Body, My Rights project here. 

Women_s Voices Series _41226_Panos_IPPF (1)_0.jpg
Resource

| 14 January 2022

European abortion policies atlas

The joint EPF-IPPF EN “European Abortion Policies Atlas” scores 52 European countries and territories on legal frameworks to access safe abortion care and clearly shows that Europe is not as progressive as it might seem.  This first in-depth analysis of abortion policies across Europe finds that legislation on abortion care throughout the region is a diverse legislative and administrative patchwork - the consequence being that women’s experience of abortion care largely depends upon their postcode: 31 countries don’t include abortion in the national health system’s financial coverage - this penalises all women and girls, but specifically the vulnerable (e.g. low income, living in rural areas, Roma, sex workers and undocumented migrants). 19 countries, including several known for progressive stances, force women to endure medically unnecessary requirements before accessing abortion care (compulsory and sometimes biased counselling, forced waiting periods). A safe, voluntary abortion should not be treated as a crime. And yet, 16 countries in Europe regulate abortion care primarily through their criminal and/or penal code. 26 countries allow health workers to deny care on the basis of their personal beliefs or convenience, thus potentially placing women in serious danger.  18 European countries fail to provide people with clear and accurate information about abortion care. Governments have a responsibility to safeguard the right of women and girls to lead free and safe reproductive lives without discrimination and coercion. We call on governments to:  Modernise abortion laws (decriminalise abortion laws, extend time limits) Ensure that abortion care is covered by the national health system Remove unnecessary obstacles in accessing abortion care following WHO recommendations Prohibit health providers from legally opting out of any part of the full spectrum of reproductive health care Provide accurate information about abortion care.

Women_s Voices Series _41226_Panos_IPPF (1)_0.jpg
Resource

| 24 September 2021

European abortion policies atlas

The joint EPF-IPPF EN “European Abortion Policies Atlas” scores 52 European countries and territories on legal frameworks to access safe abortion care and clearly shows that Europe is not as progressive as it might seem.  This first in-depth analysis of abortion policies across Europe finds that legislation on abortion care throughout the region is a diverse legislative and administrative patchwork - the consequence being that women’s experience of abortion care largely depends upon their postcode: 31 countries don’t include abortion in the national health system’s financial coverage - this penalises all women and girls, but specifically the vulnerable (e.g. low income, living in rural areas, Roma, sex workers and undocumented migrants). 19 countries, including several known for progressive stances, force women to endure medically unnecessary requirements before accessing abortion care (compulsory and sometimes biased counselling, forced waiting periods). A safe, voluntary abortion should not be treated as a crime. And yet, 16 countries in Europe regulate abortion care primarily through their criminal and/or penal code. 26 countries allow health workers to deny care on the basis of their personal beliefs or convenience, thus potentially placing women in serious danger.  18 European countries fail to provide people with clear and accurate information about abortion care. Governments have a responsibility to safeguard the right of women and girls to lead free and safe reproductive lives without discrimination and coercion. We call on governments to:  Modernise abortion laws (decriminalise abortion laws, extend time limits) Ensure that abortion care is covered by the national health system Remove unnecessary obstacles in accessing abortion care following WHO recommendations Prohibit health providers from legally opting out of any part of the full spectrum of reproductive health care Provide accurate information about abortion care.

DSW-Countdown-EconomicEmpowerment-Still.jpg
Resource

| 02 August 2021

Economic justice goes hand in hand with sexual and reproductive health and rights

The realisation of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) is a necessary precondition for achieving economic justice. A number of different components together form the basis for economic justice. These components include safe and decent work with equal and fair pay, equal access to resources and opportunities, social protection systems, as well as the right to peaceful assembly. SRHR is often not included in these discussions while it can provide basic solutions to prevailing economic inequality. It is therefore of great importance that SRHR is given priority as an integrated topic in the discussions on economic justice, especially in the light of the growing resistance towards SRHR as well as the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and its grave implications for achieving gender equality. Read our factsheet. 

DSW-Countdown-EconomicEmpowerment-Still.jpg
Resource

| 02 August 2021

Economic justice goes hand in hand with sexual and reproductive health and rights

The realisation of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) is a necessary precondition for achieving economic justice. A number of different components together form the basis for economic justice. These components include safe and decent work with equal and fair pay, equal access to resources and opportunities, social protection systems, as well as the right to peaceful assembly. SRHR is often not included in these discussions while it can provide basic solutions to prevailing economic inequality. It is therefore of great importance that SRHR is given priority as an integrated topic in the discussions on economic justice, especially in the light of the growing resistance towards SRHR as well as the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and its grave implications for achieving gender equality. Read our factsheet. 

COVID-19 and SRHR
Resource

| 09 July 2021

COVID-19 IPPF innovation and best practice

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on access to and enjoyment of sexual and reproductive health services and rights. While families, couples and individuals have faced intense pressure and hardship as a result of the pandemic, life-saving sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and supplies, including sexual and gender-based violence services, have become scarce and/or inaccessible. Existing socioeconomic inequalities have been exacerbated, especially as they pertain to girls, women and marginalised groups.  As nationally owned and locally operated health service providers, IPPF Member Associations (MAs) remain committed to their communities and the people within them. In this Case Study series, we share progress, learning and innovation that has occurred within MAs over the course of the pandemic. The case studies cover: telemedicine for abortion in the COVID-19 context, SGBV response in COVID-19, adapting sexuality education in COVID-19 through digitalisation, and leaving no one behind, especially marginalised populations. Take a look at the above Case Studies from Bulgaria, Estonia, Serbia and Ireland. 

COVID-19 and SRHR
Resource

| 09 July 2021

COVID-19 IPPF innovation and best practice

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on access to and enjoyment of sexual and reproductive health services and rights. While families, couples and individuals have faced intense pressure and hardship as a result of the pandemic, life-saving sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and supplies, including sexual and gender-based violence services, have become scarce and/or inaccessible. Existing socioeconomic inequalities have been exacerbated, especially as they pertain to girls, women and marginalised groups.  As nationally owned and locally operated health service providers, IPPF Member Associations (MAs) remain committed to their communities and the people within them. In this Case Study series, we share progress, learning and innovation that has occurred within MAs over the course of the pandemic. The case studies cover: telemedicine for abortion in the COVID-19 context, SGBV response in COVID-19, adapting sexuality education in COVID-19 through digitalisation, and leaving no one behind, especially marginalised populations. Take a look at the above Case Studies from Bulgaria, Estonia, Serbia and Ireland. 

EU flag
Resource

| 10 May 2021

European Parliament report on the situation of sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU

This European Parliament Report, authored by MEP Predrag Fred Matić, is the first report specifically dedicated to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in almost 10 years. Whilst the European Parliament has repeatedly expressed concerns over the lack of full realisation of, and attacks against women’s rights, gender equality and SRHR in various reports, this report will give a high level of political importance to SRHR at EU level. It will send a strong signal to the European Commission, EU Member States, as well as all European citizens, that MEPs are fully committed to protect and promote SRHR in the EU. The report reaffirms SRHR as human rights, intrinsically linked with gender equality and combating gender-based violence; it highlights the remaining challenges in accessing the whole range of SRHR in the EU, challenges compounded by COVID-19 measures; and denounces the backsliding on women’s rights, gender equality and SRHR across Europe and globally. To learn more about why it's important read our briefing developed with the European Parliamentary Forum for Sexual & Reproductive Rights.

EU flag
Resource

| 10 May 2021

European Parliament report on the situation of sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU

This European Parliament Report, authored by MEP Predrag Fred Matić, is the first report specifically dedicated to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in almost 10 years. Whilst the European Parliament has repeatedly expressed concerns over the lack of full realisation of, and attacks against women’s rights, gender equality and SRHR in various reports, this report will give a high level of political importance to SRHR at EU level. It will send a strong signal to the European Commission, EU Member States, as well as all European citizens, that MEPs are fully committed to protect and promote SRHR in the EU. The report reaffirms SRHR as human rights, intrinsically linked with gender equality and combating gender-based violence; it highlights the remaining challenges in accessing the whole range of SRHR in the EU, challenges compounded by COVID-19 measures; and denounces the backsliding on women’s rights, gender equality and SRHR across Europe and globally. To learn more about why it's important read our briefing developed with the European Parliamentary Forum for Sexual & Reproductive Rights.

EWAG
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Girls unite to shape the EU-Africa partnership

The European Week of Action for Girls (EWAG), that is annually organised to mark International Day of the Girl (11th October), gathers young advocates to advance girls’ rights and gender equality in the EU space. This year, it is providing a platform for girls to speak out about how the AU-EU Partnership can reflect their aspirations and unlock their potential. It is crucial that the strategy enables dialogue between both regions, allowing for mutual learning and joint and coordinated actions, especially on issues that affect girls and young women both in the EU and the AU - such as sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR), Education and Economic Empowerment and Political Participation. Over the summer of 2021 the EWAG young advocates connected on several occasions to define their recommendations to the EU in four key areas. Read more below and watch our video summarizing youth advocates' recommendations.

EWAG
Resource

| 05 October 2021

Girls unite to shape the EU-Africa partnership

The European Week of Action for Girls (EWAG), that is annually organised to mark International Day of the Girl (11th October), gathers young advocates to advance girls’ rights and gender equality in the EU space. This year, it is providing a platform for girls to speak out about how the AU-EU Partnership can reflect their aspirations and unlock their potential. It is crucial that the strategy enables dialogue between both regions, allowing for mutual learning and joint and coordinated actions, especially on issues that affect girls and young women both in the EU and the AU - such as sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR), Education and Economic Empowerment and Political Participation. Over the summer of 2021 the EWAG young advocates connected on several occasions to define their recommendations to the EU in four key areas. Read more below and watch our video summarizing youth advocates' recommendations.

women-in-community--with--bg (1).jpg
Resource

| 14 January 2022

My Body, My Rights - short film

When vulnerable communities, volunteers and professionals unite for reproductive freedom, they are a powerful force for change. Our short film features five stories that show how IPPF members in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia are supporting the lifelong reproductive health and safety of Roma girls, women and young people, working on the multiple fronts necessary to improve access and uptake of quality family planning and maternal health care. Learn more about the My Body, My Rights project here. 

women-in-community--with--bg (1).jpg
Resource

| 27 September 2021

My Body, My Rights - short film

When vulnerable communities, volunteers and professionals unite for reproductive freedom, they are a powerful force for change. Our short film features five stories that show how IPPF members in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia are supporting the lifelong reproductive health and safety of Roma girls, women and young people, working on the multiple fronts necessary to improve access and uptake of quality family planning and maternal health care. Learn more about the My Body, My Rights project here. 

Women_s Voices Series _41226_Panos_IPPF (1)_0.jpg
Resource

| 14 January 2022

European abortion policies atlas

The joint EPF-IPPF EN “European Abortion Policies Atlas” scores 52 European countries and territories on legal frameworks to access safe abortion care and clearly shows that Europe is not as progressive as it might seem.  This first in-depth analysis of abortion policies across Europe finds that legislation on abortion care throughout the region is a diverse legislative and administrative patchwork - the consequence being that women’s experience of abortion care largely depends upon their postcode: 31 countries don’t include abortion in the national health system’s financial coverage - this penalises all women and girls, but specifically the vulnerable (e.g. low income, living in rural areas, Roma, sex workers and undocumented migrants). 19 countries, including several known for progressive stances, force women to endure medically unnecessary requirements before accessing abortion care (compulsory and sometimes biased counselling, forced waiting periods). A safe, voluntary abortion should not be treated as a crime. And yet, 16 countries in Europe regulate abortion care primarily through their criminal and/or penal code. 26 countries allow health workers to deny care on the basis of their personal beliefs or convenience, thus potentially placing women in serious danger.  18 European countries fail to provide people with clear and accurate information about abortion care. Governments have a responsibility to safeguard the right of women and girls to lead free and safe reproductive lives without discrimination and coercion. We call on governments to:  Modernise abortion laws (decriminalise abortion laws, extend time limits) Ensure that abortion care is covered by the national health system Remove unnecessary obstacles in accessing abortion care following WHO recommendations Prohibit health providers from legally opting out of any part of the full spectrum of reproductive health care Provide accurate information about abortion care.

Women_s Voices Series _41226_Panos_IPPF (1)_0.jpg
Resource

| 24 September 2021

European abortion policies atlas

The joint EPF-IPPF EN “European Abortion Policies Atlas” scores 52 European countries and territories on legal frameworks to access safe abortion care and clearly shows that Europe is not as progressive as it might seem.  This first in-depth analysis of abortion policies across Europe finds that legislation on abortion care throughout the region is a diverse legislative and administrative patchwork - the consequence being that women’s experience of abortion care largely depends upon their postcode: 31 countries don’t include abortion in the national health system’s financial coverage - this penalises all women and girls, but specifically the vulnerable (e.g. low income, living in rural areas, Roma, sex workers and undocumented migrants). 19 countries, including several known for progressive stances, force women to endure medically unnecessary requirements before accessing abortion care (compulsory and sometimes biased counselling, forced waiting periods). A safe, voluntary abortion should not be treated as a crime. And yet, 16 countries in Europe regulate abortion care primarily through their criminal and/or penal code. 26 countries allow health workers to deny care on the basis of their personal beliefs or convenience, thus potentially placing women in serious danger.  18 European countries fail to provide people with clear and accurate information about abortion care. Governments have a responsibility to safeguard the right of women and girls to lead free and safe reproductive lives without discrimination and coercion. We call on governments to:  Modernise abortion laws (decriminalise abortion laws, extend time limits) Ensure that abortion care is covered by the national health system Remove unnecessary obstacles in accessing abortion care following WHO recommendations Prohibit health providers from legally opting out of any part of the full spectrum of reproductive health care Provide accurate information about abortion care.

DSW-Countdown-EconomicEmpowerment-Still.jpg
Resource

| 02 August 2021

Economic justice goes hand in hand with sexual and reproductive health and rights

The realisation of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) is a necessary precondition for achieving economic justice. A number of different components together form the basis for economic justice. These components include safe and decent work with equal and fair pay, equal access to resources and opportunities, social protection systems, as well as the right to peaceful assembly. SRHR is often not included in these discussions while it can provide basic solutions to prevailing economic inequality. It is therefore of great importance that SRHR is given priority as an integrated topic in the discussions on economic justice, especially in the light of the growing resistance towards SRHR as well as the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and its grave implications for achieving gender equality. Read our factsheet. 

DSW-Countdown-EconomicEmpowerment-Still.jpg
Resource

| 02 August 2021

Economic justice goes hand in hand with sexual and reproductive health and rights

The realisation of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) is a necessary precondition for achieving economic justice. A number of different components together form the basis for economic justice. These components include safe and decent work with equal and fair pay, equal access to resources and opportunities, social protection systems, as well as the right to peaceful assembly. SRHR is often not included in these discussions while it can provide basic solutions to prevailing economic inequality. It is therefore of great importance that SRHR is given priority as an integrated topic in the discussions on economic justice, especially in the light of the growing resistance towards SRHR as well as the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and its grave implications for achieving gender equality. Read our factsheet. 

COVID-19 and SRHR
Resource

| 09 July 2021

COVID-19 IPPF innovation and best practice

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on access to and enjoyment of sexual and reproductive health services and rights. While families, couples and individuals have faced intense pressure and hardship as a result of the pandemic, life-saving sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and supplies, including sexual and gender-based violence services, have become scarce and/or inaccessible. Existing socioeconomic inequalities have been exacerbated, especially as they pertain to girls, women and marginalised groups.  As nationally owned and locally operated health service providers, IPPF Member Associations (MAs) remain committed to their communities and the people within them. In this Case Study series, we share progress, learning and innovation that has occurred within MAs over the course of the pandemic. The case studies cover: telemedicine for abortion in the COVID-19 context, SGBV response in COVID-19, adapting sexuality education in COVID-19 through digitalisation, and leaving no one behind, especially marginalised populations. Take a look at the above Case Studies from Bulgaria, Estonia, Serbia and Ireland. 

COVID-19 and SRHR
Resource

| 09 July 2021

COVID-19 IPPF innovation and best practice

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on access to and enjoyment of sexual and reproductive health services and rights. While families, couples and individuals have faced intense pressure and hardship as a result of the pandemic, life-saving sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and supplies, including sexual and gender-based violence services, have become scarce and/or inaccessible. Existing socioeconomic inequalities have been exacerbated, especially as they pertain to girls, women and marginalised groups.  As nationally owned and locally operated health service providers, IPPF Member Associations (MAs) remain committed to their communities and the people within them. In this Case Study series, we share progress, learning and innovation that has occurred within MAs over the course of the pandemic. The case studies cover: telemedicine for abortion in the COVID-19 context, SGBV response in COVID-19, adapting sexuality education in COVID-19 through digitalisation, and leaving no one behind, especially marginalised populations. Take a look at the above Case Studies from Bulgaria, Estonia, Serbia and Ireland. 

EU flag
Resource

| 10 May 2021

European Parliament report on the situation of sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU

This European Parliament Report, authored by MEP Predrag Fred Matić, is the first report specifically dedicated to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in almost 10 years. Whilst the European Parliament has repeatedly expressed concerns over the lack of full realisation of, and attacks against women’s rights, gender equality and SRHR in various reports, this report will give a high level of political importance to SRHR at EU level. It will send a strong signal to the European Commission, EU Member States, as well as all European citizens, that MEPs are fully committed to protect and promote SRHR in the EU. The report reaffirms SRHR as human rights, intrinsically linked with gender equality and combating gender-based violence; it highlights the remaining challenges in accessing the whole range of SRHR in the EU, challenges compounded by COVID-19 measures; and denounces the backsliding on women’s rights, gender equality and SRHR across Europe and globally. To learn more about why it's important read our briefing developed with the European Parliamentary Forum for Sexual & Reproductive Rights.

EU flag
Resource

| 10 May 2021

European Parliament report on the situation of sexual and reproductive health and rights in the EU

This European Parliament Report, authored by MEP Predrag Fred Matić, is the first report specifically dedicated to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in almost 10 years. Whilst the European Parliament has repeatedly expressed concerns over the lack of full realisation of, and attacks against women’s rights, gender equality and SRHR in various reports, this report will give a high level of political importance to SRHR at EU level. It will send a strong signal to the European Commission, EU Member States, as well as all European citizens, that MEPs are fully committed to protect and promote SRHR in the EU. The report reaffirms SRHR as human rights, intrinsically linked with gender equality and combating gender-based violence; it highlights the remaining challenges in accessing the whole range of SRHR in the EU, challenges compounded by COVID-19 measures; and denounces the backsliding on women’s rights, gender equality and SRHR across Europe and globally. To learn more about why it's important read our briefing developed with the European Parliamentary Forum for Sexual & Reproductive Rights.